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Science - Neurology

Science - Neurology Discussion </> Embed Share Join Now 230

Science - Neurology

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This is a project to share any information found on the development with cancer and neurology.
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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Kornelijus G-Lithuania, Feb. 23, 2014

To my mind, our brains are the most interesting thing in the world. Brains help us think, do movements, see, hear and so on. Without brains you would look like zombie or like animal. So we should keep in mind that it is the greatest gift and we should save it.

Kornelijus G-Lithuania
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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Camilla Pashar, April 13, 2012

Understanding the denying brain:

the climate denial community, which includes fossil fuel companies, most Republican politicians and nearly all conservative corporate media outlets, make up their own facts. They can decide that global warming isn’t real or isn’t human-caused or isn’t a big deal and that climate scientists are liars and cheats. They can decide anything they want and report it as fact. And their naive, uninformed and trusting public will believe it.

Interesting read here http://blogs.redding.com/dcraig/archives/2012/04/understanding-t.html

But does anyone satirize the issue as humorously as Bill Maher?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ReNUJ3c1k68
Camilla Pashar
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  • Ayanna George Ayanna George March 4, 2013
    I completely agree with your observation of how climate change is handled in this country. Since our country is mainly influenced by conservative Republicans with major denial issues regarding climate change, it is up to us as indiviuals to conciously make an effort to be mindful of our energy consumption. I feel that our government has taken it upon them to decide for the whole country that we as humans aren't a cause of climate change, but we all know this is false.

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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Bedford Wells, March 18, 2012

Sex-deprived male fruit flies drink more — Human relevance

In experiments seeking to understand the root causes of human addiction, UCSF scientists have discovered that male fruit flies turn to alcohol when female flies reject their sexual advances.

The research team attributed the behavior to a widely known chemical in the brains of male fruit flies called neuropeptide F, which the scientists found varies in brain levels depending on the degree of the males’ success - or rejection - when seeking sex.

The human brain carries a chemical similar to neuropeptide F, which is called neuropeptide Y.
http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2012/03/17/BA9V1NKN8J.DTL

http://youtube.com/watch?v=sH9Xjk28cZ0
Bedford Wells
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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Billy Sumner, March 16, 2012

Worm Discovery Illuminates How Our Brains Might Have Evolved-
In the humble acorn worm, researchers have probed the genetic patterns of their developing larvae and think they might have discovered a set of signals similar to the ones we use to build our central nervous system.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=worm-discovery-brain-evolution

More on the origins of the vertebrate nervous system in the video lecture-

http://youtube.com/watch?v=232wtCuLsoI
Billy Sumner
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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Tom Gary, March 8, 2012

Paul Zak is a pioneer in this nascent field of neuroeconomics. In a recent paper published in the journal PLoS One, he examined genes that may predict success among traders on Wall Street. His forthcoming book, “The Moral Molecule,” will explore how a chemical in the brain called oxytocin compels cooperation in society.

http://www.latimes.com/health/la-sci-neuroeconomics-paul-zak-20120303,0,7714923.story

http://youtube.com/watch?v=gmuOW6qGbx4
Tom Gary
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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Jill Davies, Feb. 22, 2012

Older adults with too much salt in diet and too little exercise at greater risk of cognitive decline:

he finding, which appeared online Aug. 22 in the journal Neurobiology of Aging, ahead of print publication, may have significant public health implications, emphasizing the importance of addressing multiple lifestyle factors that can impact brain health.

http://snip.it/s/1msf
Jill Davies
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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Mark Collins, Feb. 20, 2012

Regular exercise can improve memory and learning: Scientists

Exercising for up to an hour a day can improve memory and learning in children and the elderly, scientists have found.

Walking or cycling regularly for between six months to a year can improve memory and problem solving skills in the elderly by between 15 and 20 per cent, according to researchers.

Professor Art Kramer, director of the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois, who led the research, said their findings could have major implications for improving children’s performance at school, and it could also be used to help the elderly combat memory loss in old age.

http://www.todayonline.com/Health/EDC120220-0000109/Regular-exercise-can-improve-memory-and-learning—Scientists

http://youtube.com/watch?v=A5-kbfnCq6M
Mark Collins
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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Mușat Adriana, Feb. 19, 2012

Neuroscience Meets Education and Technology

Technological Trends will include computer technology, biotechnology and nanotechnology and cognition and the convergence of these technologies. The U.S. military and the UK government are studying psychopharmacology for increased attention and cognition, and personalized genetic mapping and enhancement. The Human Cognome Project is seeking to map the brain like the Human Genome Project has done for the geneAdditionally, Nanotechnology is producing new drugs that treat cancer, engineer materials to replace diseased organs, repair nerve damage, and improve prosthetic limbs, among many other medical breakthroughs. The National Nanotechnology Initiative has identified other areas of focus in enhancing group creativity and cognitive engineering.. A “Virtual You” is being constructed at Sandia Laboratory to model human consciousness and cognitive abilities. Dr. Candace Pert has identified an information network within the human body where peptide messages triggered by emotions regulate body chemical processes.
New Technologies provide the following opportunities: the backbone for the communications necessary for globalization, the ability to “leapfrog” current technology where there are no old infrastructure or mentalities to be uprooted, the creation of new online societies and training environments and the simulation of current social problems.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CrSR-55xXD8&feature=related

Mușat Adriana
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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Dan Thompson, Feb. 18, 2012

Jeff Hawkins on how brain science will change computing

Treo creator Jeff Hawkins urges us to take a new look at the brain — to see it not as a fast processor, but as a memory system that stores and plays back experiences to help us predict, intelligently, what will happen next.

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/jeff_hawkins_on_how_brain_science_will_change_computing.html
Dan Thompson
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Discussions Discussion Science - Neurology
Tony Trevari, Feb. 17, 2012

The Brain Science Behind Lin-Sanity

Experts who study sports psychology say Lin has performed another remarkable feat — blocking out outside pressures to allow his athletic skills to shine.

“How we think about whether we are going to succeed or fail changes whether or not our brain supports our skills,” said Sian Beilock, author of the book “ “Choke: What the Secrets of the Brain Reveal About Getting It Right When You Have To” ” and a psychology professor at the University of Chicago. “Focusing on what you want to achieve rather than why you’ve failed in the past prepares you to perform at your best. When you are focused on failing, often times you try to control every aspect of what you are doing. You essentially screw yourself up.”

http://news.discovery.com/adventure/science-jeremy-lin-121602.html

http://youtube.com/watch?v=1rfhOgmbuIc
Tony Trevari
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