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Medicine and Public Health in American History

Medicine and Public Health in American History Discussion </> Embed Share Join Now 50

Medicine and Public Health in American History

This course offers an introduction to differing conceptions of disease, health, and healing throughout American history, the changing role and image of medicine and medical professionals in American life, and the changing social and cultural meanings and entanglements of medical science and practice throughout American history.
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Sami Rourke, April 12, 2012

Dr. Lester Breslow dies at 97; UCLA dean was ‘Mr. Public Health’

Breslow played a key role in medicine’s transition from an emphasis on simply treating disease to a much broader effort to prevent it. Medicine focused “almost exclusively on communicable diseases when I started” in the 1940s, he recently recalled. “I felt public health needed a broader vision.”

Most physicians today would recognize that it is just as important to prevent disease, particularly diabetes, heart conditions and other chronic illnesses, as it is to treat them. But when Breslow began his work, his concerns were met with skepticism and outright disdain.

http:// http://www.latimes.com/news/obituaries/la-me-lester-breslow-20120412,0,1851183.story
Sami Rourke
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Jenny Knuthsen, April 11, 2012

Warning over online ‘smart drugs’ that can kill:

The report entitled Human Enhancement Drugs – The Emerging Challenges to Public Health charts unprecedented growth over the past few years in the usage of such drugs, sourced from a vast and illicit market.

Many users do not fit the stereotype druggy and come from respectable background but believe ordinary characteristics need improving.

Professor Mark Bellis, co-author and Director of the North West Public Health Observatory and Centre for Public Health, said: “We are seeing a redefinition of what health means. For many, the consequences of a natural ageing process are no longer acceptable.

For other perfectly healthy people, they feel their strength, intelligence or looks still require treatment.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5HvuLln5lU
Jenny Knuthsen
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Anita Singh, April 3, 2012

Great lecture by Howard Frumkin on Health and the Built Environment: Urban Ecosystems in Which People Thrive.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oMsy0G3jiqU
Anita Singh
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Sami Rourke, March 23, 2012

U.S. health systems not ready for catastrophes: report

The report recommends a systems-based approach to allocating resources and delivering care during catastrophic events. It also provides the organizations and agencies involved in disaster planning and response with tools and guidelines to help them identify their core functions during a major disaster, the release said.

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2012-03-health-ready-catastrophes.html
Sami Rourke
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Sami Rourke, Feb. 28, 2012

The condition known as Flourosis, which is caused by primarily from water flouridation, affects 41% of 12 to 15 year olds. Flourosis weakens tooth enamel.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Gp3wJjzrrhE
Sami Rourke
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Jessica Darby, Feb. 28, 2012

Is Water Flouridation Good for Public Health?

But why is politicized opposition to fluoride happening now?* The process has been in use since the 1940s, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) hail it as one of the top preventative public health measures of all time. It is thoroughly supported by the American Dental Association, and when it was initiated in the middle of the 20th century, rates of dental cavities fell by 50 percent or higher, arguably because of fluoride. But opposition groups, notably the Fluoride Action Network, a non-profit dedicated to fluoride-danger awareness, put forth a much darker picture. They say the effect of tap water fluoride on tooth decay is hard to pinpoint, and in a large enough quantity, fluoride is a toxin — one that can possibly make bones fragile, lower IQ in children, and contribute to bone cancer. They insist cavities can be prevented by brushing alone.

Interesting article in the Atlantic

http://theatlantic.com/health/archive/2012/02/what-do-we-know-about-fluoride/252683/

http://youtube.com/watch?v=yblka13FfCA
Jessica Darby
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  • Sami Rourke Sami Rourke Feb. 28, 2012
    Dental fluorosis is a developmental disturbance of dental enamel caused by excessive exposure to high concentrations of fluoride during tooth development. The risk of fluoride overexposure occurs between the ages of 3 months and 8 years. In its mild forms (which are its most common), fluorosis often appears as unnoticeable, tiny white streaks or specks in the enamel of the tooth. In its most severe form, tooth appearance is marred by discoloration or brown markings. The enamel may be pitted, rough and hard to clean. The spots and stains left by fluorosis are permanent and may darken over time.

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Thomas Billingsly, Feb. 28, 2012

Marijuana measure makes Colorado ballot:

Colorado is one of 16 states along with Washington, D.C. that already allow marijuana use for medical purposes even as cannabis remains classified as an illegal narcotic under federal law. Public opinion is sharply divided on the merits of full legalization. This is a touchy, and very current, issue in the USA in both medical and legal circles.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=7865KKk_qv8&feature=related
Thomas Billingsly
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