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History of Ancient Rome

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History of Ancient Rome

This course introduces students to the history of ancient Rome from Romulus to Constantine (8th c. BC – early 4th c. AD). We will examine the meteoric spread of Roman rule in Italy and the ancient Mediterranean, the brilliance of a republican form of government tragically swept away by destructive civil war, the rise of repressive autocracy under the Caesars, and the threats to empire in late antiquity posed inside by the rise of Christianity and outside by hostile invaders. Special attention will be given to the types of primary evidence—historiography, inscriptions, coins, art and architecture—and how they influence our understanding of ancient Rome.
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Discussions Discussion History of Ancient Rome
Jessica Darby, March 23, 2012

Juno arrives at Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts:

The largest classical statue in the U.S., it has been dated to the Roman Imperial Period (27 BC to 565 AD) and probably stood before a civic building or temple in ancient Rome.

She will eventually reign over the future gallery dedicated to the Gods, Goddesses, and Heroes of Ancient Greece and Rome, after a delicate shipping process documented in this video.

http://www.dailynewstranscript.com/arts/x394117183/Juno-arrives-at-Museum-of-Fine-Arts-for-all-to-see#axzz1pvX1bDgL

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Ewai2Tvtybc
Jessica Darby
Comments (1)
  • Tom Gary Tom Gary March 23, 2012
    Looking forward to seeing her on my next visit to the MFA. Here's some interesting background.

    Juno is an ancient Roman goddess, the protector and special counselor of the state. She is a daughter of Saturn and sister (but also the wife) of the chief god Jupiter and the mother of Mars and Vulcan. Juno also looked after the women of Rome. As the patron goddess of Rome and the Roman Empire she was called Regina (“queen”) and, together with Jupiter and Minerva, was worshipped as a triad on the Capitol (Juno Capitolina) in Rome.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juno_%28mythology%29

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Discussions Discussion History of Ancient Rome
Jessie Rhodes, March 19, 2012

Mesmerizing video tours Ancient Rome — in 3D:

The project started with a plaster model of the city in 1996 and has since grown into a digital effort in collaboration and knowledge building. The online 3D project was unveiled in 2007 and continues to grow.

http://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pHinQD3GAIo
Jessie Rhodes
Comments (1)
  • Rudy Maya Rudy Maya May 21, 2012
    omg this is the awesomest thing ever.. glad i joined this site (: ty for posting..
    -ancient rome enthusiast..

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Discussions Discussion History of Ancient Rome
Jessie Rhodes, March 8, 2012

Deforestation during the Roman period:

Housing & building, fuel, agriculture, over grazing. All were part of deforestation during ancient Roman times. Wikipedia offers an interesting look at this topic.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deforestation_during_the_Roman_period
Jessie Rhodes
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Discussions Discussion History of Ancient Rome
Julie Lin, March 5, 2012

Interesting video about the ancient Romans use of Greek and Etruscan influence in their architecture.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=B8IcwFwNLr8
Julie Lin
Comments (4)
  • Bedford Wells Bedford Wells March 5, 2012
    +1
  • Mark Collins Mark Collins March 5, 2012
    Very nice photo gallery of the Pantheon here:
    http://www.greatbuildings.com/buildings/Pantheon.html
  • Henry Hamilton Henry Hamilton March 7, 2012
    This is really awesome insight into the history and civil engineering expertise that went into building ancient Roman monuments and buildings. I wish they would of gone into details about the support structure used to support the drying cement for the dome rood of the Pantheon. I'm guessing it was something similar to ply wood.
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Discussions Discussion History of Ancient Rome
JP Lopez, March 1, 2012

Vatican reveals a selection of historic documents from its secret archives:

Galileo’s retraction of his theories and the excommunication of Martin Luther are among the closely guarded documents that the Vatican has put on display to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the establishment of its archives at its current location in Rome.

The Holy See on Wednesday opened an exhibition of 100 documents — a tiny fraction of its archives — in Rome’s Capitoline Museums. The exhibit is entitled “Lux in Arcana: The Vatican Secret Archives Reveals itself.”

http://worldnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/02/29/10541847-vatican-reveals-a-selection-of-historic-documents-from-its-secret-archives

http://youtube.com/watch?v=0rknGUS4bUg&feature=player_embedded
JP Lopez
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Discussions Discussion History of Ancient Rome
Camilla Pashar, Feb. 28, 2012

The MAXXI museum, Rome’s new National Museum of 21st Century Arts, looks about as un-Roman as you could possibly imagine.

Instead of classical columns and pediments and relief carvings of ancient gods, MAXXI features sweeping curves of molded concrete and glass, accented by a rectangular form thrusting out of one of its flanks like a gigantic loudspeaker.

Designed by Zaha Hadid, the Iraqi-born London architect whose buildings resemble broken shards of metal, or the arcs of jet trails in the sky, MAXXI is totally unlike anything else in its neighborhood, or, indeed, the entire city. That’s precisely the point. And it’s actually refreshing.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=qLMMmJzDvR8
Camilla Pashar
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Discussions Discussion History of Ancient Rome
Henry Hamilton, Feb. 24, 2012

Jeff Gundlach, CEO with DoubleLine Capital LP in Los Angeles, used the parallels between Ancient Rome and the U.S. to frame his latest webcast this week.

In the webcast, Mr. Gundlach goes on to point out that, like the Roman Empire of yesteryear, the U.S. today maintains a massive debt load and by far the world’s largest military budget. And like Rome, where a destitute underclass was granted little social mobility, a similar “underclass” is emerging in the U.S.

Below is the presentation where Jeff Gundlach dares to compare the US to the Roman Empire:

http://www.businessinsider.com/doubleline-jeff-gundlach-us-decline-fall-roman-empire-2012-2#-11
Henry Hamilton
Comments (1)
  • Bedford Wells Bedford Wells Feb. 24, 2012
    With approximately 2000 years separating ancient Rome and current day USA, such comparisons must be done carefully. But many similarities between the two societies can indeed be seen. For example: 1) The waging of multiple wars in far away lands, and 2) the creation of a professional military organization with long terms of service far from home.

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Discussions Discussion History of Ancient Rome
Elsa Maestra, Nov. 12, 2011

All Hail Berlusconi
“The Roman emperors knew that the secret to exercising peaceful rule over the people was to provide them with bread and circus. Well, Berlusconi owns the circus, pretty much all of it - the TV, the football, the magazines, the books. And as a head of government, who also happens to own Italy’s biggest supermarket chain, he also controls, in the widest sense of the word, the bread.”

This comes from an article by John Carlin that was published in The Observer 7+ years ago but provides good analysis of how Berlusconi managed to stay in power for 17 years!

Full article at:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2004/jan/18/italy.features

http://www.flickr.com/photos/nikosv/3879974363/
Elsa Maestra
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