Loading...

To post, comment, or enjoy any of the other features of Einztein, please register.
Already registered? Then log in!

DISCUSS: Green products

DISCUSS: Green products Discussion </> Embed Share Join Now 159

DISCUSS: Green products

Moderated by Marita Batsiou
A major concern when it comes to green products seems to be their cost and, in some cases, their availability. How can they be made more affordable and accessible?
 
Join Discussion to Post
Filter By
  • My Posts
  • Learned Posts
  • My Discussions
  • Joined Discussions
  • Favorite Members
  • Curated Posts
Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
Jason Hodin, Oct. 22, 2013

Wi-Fi from a light bulb!

http://hellawella.com/china-just-discovered-how-get-wi-fi-lightbulb?utm_source=MagnetMail&utm_medium=email&utm_term=seastar@stanford.edu&utm_content=LF%2DNLE%2DHellaWella%2D10%2D22%2D2013&utm_campaign
Jason Hodin
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
Ryan P-USA, Oct. 5, 2013

Hi, my name is Ryan Poon and I live in Oakland, CA.

I chose this discussion of green products because they are essential to a sustainable future and play a large part in the development of a clean environment. However, as the prompt suggests, green products are difficult to attain. They are often expensive and hard to find. For example, for my environmental science class, I was required to purchase a notebook made of recycled paper. The notebook cost four dollars, which was significantly more than the one-cent price of a regular notebook. Though some products may be environmentally friendly, it’s difficult to push ourselves to buy something over another item that essentially serves the same purpose. I think the best way to make green products more affordable is to find cheaper, alternative methods or materials to manufacture the object while also maintaining its eco-friendliness. To increase its availability, I think that the places that sell green products should promote them more, such as by placing them near the front door or behind the store window.

I did some general research about green products and I came across this interesting article, which presented some other problems about this subject. According to the text, many companies have been “greenwashing” people with firm environmental values by misleading them with their products’ titles of “green”, “environmentally friendly”, and other such names. The author makes known the fact that all products, regardless of whether they are green or not, have an ecological footprint. No item is actually environmentally “good”; each one has its own advantages and disadvantages. Though some companies may claim that their product is green, they often do not mention the other processes required, such as production, transportation, usage, and disposal.

The article here may make one slightly depressed, especially as in addition to these problems, green products are expensive and often inaccessible. However, the author instructs us not to lose hope, but rather become knowledgeable of products and issues and circumvent the titles companies may place on their merchandise. Another way we can avoid buying the wrong manufactured goods is by asking ourselves if we really need them or if we could reuse something we already have.

Nevertheless, it is difficult to discern what is right and what is false. How would you determine whether a product is actually green or not? How would you solve this problem?

http://www.dailyorange.com/2013/10/callaghan-companies-should-resist-urge-to-mislabel-products-as-green-purely-to-appeal-to-customers/
Ryan P-USA
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
Josiah Likkel, Feb. 13, 2013

I’m Josiah Likkel, and I live in Seattle, WA. This whole issue concerning green products, both their popularity and their cost, is one of the biggest obstacles for those trying to “go green” and reduce their carbon emissions, and other environmentally related lifestyle transitions. Growing up in a city where going green is viewed as almost equal to an act of heroism, I notice that those who can carry out such a lifestyle are often far wealthier than most-the green elites, as I call them- and they have an intolerant outlook on those who cannot live the same, expensive way. Some, if not most, people simply cannot afford to live in a privileged manner in which they can pay bills, provide for their families and maintain an ecologically acceptable existence. Instead of just telling people what they have to do to go green and hoping for success, we must brainstorm possible solutions that will lead to these resources being more excessible to the general public rather than targeting the upper-middle class and upper class-some ways include community development/restoration, price reductions on organic produce (eventually), and the heightened availability and affordability of hybrid-electric vehicles (again, eventually). Everyone can make a difference… but they need to given the chance to do so first That is when progress will truly be made.

http://Http
Josiah Likkel
Comments (3)
  • Janelle Guldahl Janelle Guldahl Feb. 18, 2013
    I agree with what you're saying, I feel as thought the the environmentalists and such people don't want to give the average person a chance to change their ways. I think that to make change they need to think about how a city would go about going green in a way that benefits everyone who wants to make a difference.
  • Märta W-Sweden Märta W-Sweden Oct. 10, 2013
    I totally agree with you Josiah! It is almost the same with developing countries. They don’t have the economy to consider if their growth is clean or not even if they might want to buy green products. It is unfair to blame developing countries for the emissions they cause on their way to prosperity. Every country needs to prioritize growth in the first place. Developing countries wouldn’t be given a chance to contribute unless the prices start to be realistic for their economies!
  • Elise s-usa Elise s-usa Oct. 14, 2013
    I was thinking the same thing. Lots of the more efficient technology these days are very expensive. I'm sure lots of people would love to have solar panels powering their house or toilets that use less water. The problem isn't that people don't care about the environment, it's that a lot of people can't afford the eco friendly technology. We need to work to make green products more accessible to everyone.

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
ruby vozza, Feb. 12, 2013

I’m from Seattle, Washington where we get a lot of rain. if you too live in a place with consistent rainfall a great way to divert run off would be installing a rain garden. If you aren’t familiar with what rain gardens are it is a shallow depression that is planted in soil with deep-rooted plants and grasses, it allows rainwater runoff to be absorbed back into the earth opposed to into streets and sewers. This is good because typically runoff will flow into storm drains and surface waters which often cause erosion, water pollution, and flooding. The initial purpose of a rain garden is to improve the quality of water in nearby bodies of water by cutting down the amount of pollution reaching creeks and streams by up to 30%. Owning a rain garden can help you reduce your carbon footprint.

ruby vozza
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
Cheryl P-US, Nov. 29, 2012

There are many reasons to why we should use green cleaning products. When we hear the word green we staart to think about life, plants, or maybe recycling. Green products are products that have less of an impact to the environment or also known as eco-friendly. People use green cleaning products to avoid harsh chemicals in conventional cleaning products. Here IS a comparison between two green cleaning products to see which is more eco-friendly. Many compare the Green Works natural by clorox to the Nature’s Source by Windex. They are both fairly similar. I think we should use green products cause they contain less toxins.

http://www.thedailygreen.com/green-homes/latest/best-green-cleaning-products#slide-7
Cheryl P-US
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
Julie M-United States, Nov. 16, 2012

You know those water bottles that use less plastic? The coffee cups that use recycled paper, etc.? I believe these products shouldn’t just be “special”; they should be all products. The “greenness” should be applied to every product that is used daily. Imagine if instead of your cleaner reading “green”, the greenness was assumed!

http://www.livestrong.com/article/140134-products-from-recycled-materials/
Julie M-United States
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
Lauren L-USA, Nov. 15, 2012

I think a big reason why green products are not very cheap and accessible right now may be because companies do not support the making of green products. Listed in the link below are the top 10 companies that support the making of eco-friendly products. Among the top 10 companies include Office Depot, Sprint, and Microsoft. These companies encourage their employees to reduce their carbon footprint by giving them incentives to limit unnecessary travel or by refusing to buy supplies from companies who contribute to deforestation. Sprint encourages recycling by giving consumer credits to customers who recycle their old phones before buying new ones. I think that green products can be made more affordable and accessible if we support the companies listed in the link below as well as other green companies. These companies can then become the example for others to begin making green products. If all companies made eco-friendly products, then not only would green products be available to everyone, but the environment will also benefit as a result.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/newsweek/features/2012/newsweek-green-rankings.html
Lauren L-USA
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
Megan R-USA, Nov. 15, 2012

One product that causes a major problem in the environment is plastic, nonreusable, water bottles. So many people use plastic water bottles everyday, when in truth, for this situation, the green product is actually more affordable. If you bought a reusable water bottle and filled it up everyday, then you would actually be saving money because instead of spending about four dollars a week, you spend about ten dollars one time, and then you are done. One problem with reusable water bottles though, is that you can run out of water fast, and then if you are thirsty again and are out, it would probably be a challenge to refill it, so instead you just buy a plastic bottle of water from somewhere. This is were the community comes into the picture. At my school, we have a few water fountains that also have little spouts to refill water bottles. I think if we placed these all around the community, people would be more inclined to just get a reusable water bottle and fill it up instead of buying a new plastic bottle everytime they are thirsty.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Se12y9hSOM0
Megan R-USA
Comments (1)
  • Dorothy N-USA Dorothy N-USA Nov. 15, 2012
    I totally agree with you. I think that in this day in age plastic water bottles should be out of the picture. Everyone should have access to a reusable water bottle or cup and use it for their everyday drinks. Producing and distributing plastic water bottles in factories obviously emits a lot of carbon into the air. The higher the demand is, the more water bottling companies will manufacture these products. So, more people should be encouraged to buy reusable water bottles. I think a big step to reducing our carbon emission as a country is making reusable water bottles affordable and easy to get a hold of. Communities should be encouraged to install drinking fountains in places like parks, bus stops, and shopping malls. Great topic, Megan!

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
Colleen C-USA, Nov. 15, 2012

Since I am involved in sports and many extra curricular activities, I find myself going through numerous amounts of water bottles a day. Try as I might, I can never seem to stop using them. They’e always available in vending machines and sold in our cafeteria. I’ve tried using reusable bottles, but could never seem to find one that I absolutely liked. I did some research and found some reviews on eco-friendly, reusable bottles that have been tested and approved to be user and environmentally helpful. Our school is already supplied with water fountains that accommodate for reusable bottles, helping us students save thousands of plastic bottles from landfills. By changing my ways I would not only be choosing a more eco-friendly option, but a simpler one.

http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/product-reviews/eco-friendly-products/reusable-water-bottle-reviews/best-reusable-water-bottles#slide-2
Colleen C-USA
Comments (1)
  • Kathryn G-USA Kathryn G-USA Nov. 15, 2012
    That's a great idea! I'm also an athlete and though I try to bring bottles home to recycle whenever I can, that doesn't always work out. With the use of a resuable water bottle, I won't have to worry about constantly taking home plastic bottles to recycle. Lastly, this opperation can save TONS of money! How much better can this get?

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion DISCUSS: Green products
Sarah T-USA, Nov. 15, 2012

When you really think about it… where do we get all of our energy to power machines, electronics, and all these appliances we have. Oil, coal, natural gas; we use all of these to power such things. Oil that came from the compressed and heated bones of a dead dinosaur or pehistoric plant from millions of years ago. These resources are non-renewable, which means we have to take action in finding ways to conserve them.

How about energy that comes from the sun; a resource that will never be used up by humans? One that is environmentally friendly, and releases no CO2 emissions?

If more people switched to solar panels for powering their house, I believe less CO2 emissions would be produced, and many carbon footprints would be decreased.

http://www.amazon.com/Sunforce-50022-Battery-Trickle-Charger/dp/B0006JO0TC/ref=sr_1_6?s=lawn-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1353029218&sr=1-6
Sarah T-USA
Comments (2)
  • Jason Hodin Jason Hodin Dec. 1, 2012
    most college (and even many high school) students carry around laptops, ipads or other personal devices all day while at school. What if everyone had a backpack with a solar panel sticked in to the back? While walking from class to class, that panel could be charging a battery or the devices themselves. Everyone could put their backpacks by the window during class to charge up the batteries during that time as well. what do you think?
  • Jason Hodin Jason Hodin Dec. 1, 2012
    (I meant “…stitched into the back”)

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Are you sure?