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Internet's Role in Popular Uprising

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Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising Restricted

Moderated by Bert Breton
This project examines the role played by the Internet and social media in supporting popular revolts in countries around the world.
 
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Jessie Rhodes, Nov. 9, 2011

Forecasts for a “CHINESE SPRING” :: The Chinese government has been exceptionally shrewd at monitoring and restricting its citizens’ Internet use, so far. But Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales insisted in a presentation last week that China’s government can’t keep the information out forever.

http://www.wfs.org/content/forecasts-for-%E2%80%9Cchinese-spring%E2%80%9D

Wales predicted that Chinese Internet activism will eventually galvanize a mass general strike. Once mobilized, this mass uprising would shake the whole country and destroy the reigning Communist Party. “The new generation of bloggers, Wikipedians, people on Twitter, people on social networks—they are there and they are becoming stronger.

Here’s the podcast of Jimmy Wales’ speech ath the BBC sponsored Free Thinking Festival 2011

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/console/b016kgfd
Jessie Rhodes
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Bert Breton, Nov. 4, 2011

Arab Spring Activists Sit Down With Silicon Valley Suits:

Last week, tech executives and Internet activists swarmed San Francisco for the first ever Silicon Valley Human Rights Conference. The two-day event focused on the increasingly complex relationship between the Internet and human rights. Access, an advocacy organization for Internet rights, hosted the conference, and drew representatives from influential players in Silicon Valley and activists arriving from revolution or government oppression in places like Egypt, Syria, Uganda, and Thailand. The event touched on issues like Internet access, freedom of speech, and corporate responsibility, but mostly just made clear that this is only the beginning of the digital rights conversation. Video coverage below…

http://news.yourolivebranch.org/2011/11/03/arab-spring-activists-sit-down-with-silicon-valley-suits/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWF1Gp4vIrQ
Bert Breton
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Ricky Burkhardt, Oct. 29, 2011

Tensions are still high in the Tunisian town whose protests started the Arab Spring.

In Sidi Bouzid violence erupted over complaints that, despite the first truly free elections in years, nothing has really changed for the people living here.

The protests began after Popular List party candidates were disqualified and their seats lost, even though many people in the town had voted for the party.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r1k5l9xZq3E
Ricky Burkhardt
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Henry Hamilton, Oct. 27, 2011

Following Tunisia’s elections a few days ago, democracy is bringing more political Islam in the countries of the Arab Spring.

The strong showing of Tunisia’s moderate Islamists in Sunday’s election and a promise by Libyan National Transitional Council leader Mustafa Abdel Jalil to uphold “Sharia Law” have highlighted the bigger role Islamists will play after the fall of the autocrats who opposed them.

To talk about Sharia law and the concerns it raises, Eric Chaumont, of France’s National Centre for Scientific Research, speaks on Euronews

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7zLGa397ws
Henry Hamilton
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Jenny Rothberg, Oct. 22, 2011

Tunisia elections seen as litmus test for Arab Spring

Tunisia’s revolution, which kicked-off in December 2010 under a wave of discontent over poor economic conditions and unemployment, sparked protests across North Africa toppling dictators in both Egypt and Libya. This weekend, enthusiasm if building for their first free elections

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLcubB9qXXo
Jenny Rothberg
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Andrew P, Oct. 21, 2011

In case you’re wondering which of Gadaffi’s sons died with him and what he looked like when he was alive… standing next to Hillary Clinton, here ya go…

http://www.flickr.com/photos/68893426@N06/6267922888/
Andrew P
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Bert Breton, Oct. 20, 2011

A senior National Transitional Council official in Libya has said that deposed Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi has died of his wounds after being captured near his hometown of Sirte.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6A5WXVuy_o&feature=player_embedded#!
Bert Breton
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Andrew P, Oct. 20, 2011

Muammar Gaddafi, 7 June 1942 – 20 October 2011

Excerpt from “The Solution to the Problems of Democracy; The Social Basis to the Third Universal Theory” aka, Gaddafi’s Green Book.

If a community of people wears white on a mournful occasion and another dresses in black, then one community would like white and dislike black and the other would like black and dislike white. Moreover, this attitude leaves a physical effect on the cells as well as on the genes in the body.”

So, today, in “honor” of Gaddafi, I’m wearing black AND white.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/68893426@N06/6264095154/
Andrew P
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Nina Dumas, Oct. 19, 2011

Social media is having a big impact on the Occupy Walll Street protests. This news segment highlights online sentiment surrounding the manifestations.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDajz-4oh0E&feature=player_embedded
Nina Dumas
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Camilla Pashar, Oct. 19, 2011

Arab Spring faces crucial test in Tunisia elections:

As the land that launched the Arab Spring heads into historic elections next week, all eyes are on the long-repressed Islamists - and whether a big victory for them will irrevocably change this North African nation and inspire similar conservative movements around the region. Many fear that despite vows to uphold democracy, Tunisia’s Islamist Ennahda Party is bent on imposing a theocracy that would roll back hard-won secularism and women’s rights.

Great video coverage by France 24

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WqM7T9ZoeY
Camilla Pashar
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