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Posts tagged "food" - Page 6

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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Rachel P-US, Oct. 7, 2013

It’s really fantastic to see that lots of people also eat locally grown food. It might just be me, but I feel like locally grown foods taste better. I predict that this is because there aren’t any pesticides that are on the foods; mainly because you can control what goes on them while they are growing.

Think about the large carbon footprint for a little bunch of carrots from England. If you are buying locally, you help support farmers in your area and help with the local economy.

Local foods help with food safety. If you know where your food was grown (say, your backyard) than you aren’t at risk if you learn of an outbreak of a disease that is being spread through food. In 2006 there was an e. coli outbreak in spinach. If you knew exactly where your spinach came from, you wouldn’t have to worry about anything.

Below are links to websites that talk about more benefits to eating locally grown food

http://www.dosomething.org/tipsandtools/why-buy-locally-grown

http://www.openhand.org/2011/07/20/the-benefits-of-eating-locally-grown-foods/

http://msue.anr.msu.edu/news/7_benefits_of_eating_local_foods
Rachel P-US
Comments (1)
  • Jason Hodin Jason Hodin Oct. 7, 2013
    It's not just you! Local also often means fresher — there is no doubt that many vegetables and fruits taste better right after they are harvested.

    For example, I once had the opportunity -in Sumatera, Indonesia- to eat a pineapple literally minutes after it was picked and you would not believe the difference!

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Cameron M- United States, Oct. 7, 2013

Something as simple as eating less red meat can actually decrease your carbon footprint. The usual red meat comes from animals like cows or sheep. But these animals emit big amounts of methane, another greenhouse gas that is ultimately a bit worse than CO2. Other meats such as pork and chicken would be a better alternative. Pigs, chickens, and other animals produce far less emissions. According to Brave New Climate’s article “Top 10 ways to reduce your CO2 emissions footprint, “At average levels of consumption, a family’s emissions from beef would easily outweigh the construction and running costs of a large 4WD vehicle in less than 5 years.” Of course this doesn’t mean that we have to cut out red meat entirely, but eating less steak means much less CO2!

http://bravenewclimate.com/2008/08/29/top-10-ways-to-reduce-your-co2-emissions-footprint/
Cameron M- United States
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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Victoria L- USA, Oct. 7, 2013

I think buying and eating locally grown food is so much better than food that has to be shipped from long distances. Foods that are not locally grown increase the amount of carbon being released into the atmosphere because a lot of transportation is needed to get it from its original location to your home. Some transportation that could be needed are boats, planes, and trucks that release a lot of carbon. My family has a garden at our home and we grow tomatoes, lettuce, and many various fruits and vegetables. Eating locally grown food is not only better for the environment- because less transportation is necessary, but also better for you. Locally grown food does not have pesticides or other foreign substances in it. If you do not already have a home garden, you should think about making one. Even if you do not have a lot of space at all or live in an apartment, you can still have a home garden. Here is a link with more information: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ST5rQAt5-_0

Victoria L- USA
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Kelsey D - USA, Oct. 7, 2013

From what I have learned in class so far, eating proteins such as eggs, chicken, and pork increases our carbon emission because of the transportation it takes to get the meat to the grocery store. After some research, I learned that including frozen foods, such as ice cream, can also reduce your carbon footprint according to this article:http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/06/business/worldbusiness/06iht-greencol07.4.6029437.html?_r=0 Eating cold foods lowers our body temperature, so we won’t use as much air conditioning in our home. I thought this was interesting. I don’t think this means we should all include a ton of ice cream in our diet, but maybe cold/frozen drinks can have the same effect.

Kelsey D - USA
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Kelly H-USA, Oct. 7, 2013

Even though almost a billion people on the Earth don’t have enough food to eat according to the FAO, we still grow food to feed 10 billion people says the Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eric-holt-gimenez/world-hunger_b_1463429.html). The problem is that we can’t distribute this food to the people who need it. This leads to all that excess fruit being wasted, which doesn’t help carbon output. If we could find a way to quickly and non-wastefully ship this food, we could more easily solve the problem of world hunger. What could be some easy ways to transport food around the world?

Kelly H-USA
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Discussions Discussion Living the Healthy Happy Life
Meredith D-UnitedstatesofAmerica, Oct. 7, 2013

Hi, I want to share with you how i will help reduce my carbon footprint. I am going to start to not only eat local organic foods, but also eating healthier in general. It is easy to find a local farmers market. The food may be a little more expensive but, it has less chemicals. You will notice that the food will taste better and make you feel better. Chemicals that they put in food to make it grow faster or bigger, can be very bad for you. To neutralize the effect of the first bad chemical the companies sometimes put in more chemicals. This can take almost all of the nutrient out of the food and puts harmful chemicals into the soil.

So next time I eat, I’m going to try to go local, eat fresh, and encourage others to eat healthy and chemical free. Your not only helping yourself by eating local and organic, your helping discourage the use of harmful chemicals to excel the growth rate of fruits and veggies

http://www.visithoustontexas.com/shopping/farmers-markets/
Meredith D-UnitedstatesofAmerica
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Julia Götborg, Oct. 7, 2013

Hey guys! My name is Julia and I live in Gothenburg, the second largest city in Sweden. From what I can tell in this discussion as well as in prior research (http://www.unep.org/wed/quickfacts/), the waste of food in rich countries are considered a main reason for the negative impact on the climate. I have come across a simple tip that we all can use in order to decrease our waste!

In Sweden the food in the stores are marked with something called “Bäst fore datum” which translates to “Freshness date” in English. Do you have these in your countries too? Of course these markings are practical in order for people not to eat bad or rotten food, however studies show that these dates are set way too early. This Swedish study (http://www.konsumentforeningenstockholm.se/Pressrum/Pressmeddelanden/Cision-flode1/Ny-studie-visar-att-agg-haller-minst-en-manad-efter-bast-fore-datum/) shows that eggs may last up to 1 month after the “freshness date” has expired! The food companies are bound by law not to put anything bad in the market, otherwise they can be sued, which leads to them marking the food with dates that allows a room for error, not correctly according to ability to eat. This study from a Swedish university proves this correct; http://stud.epsilon.slu.se/4665/1/jonsson_c_120814.pdf.pdf.

So, my tip for all of you! Do not trust the marks blindly, use your eyes, ears and taste buds to determine if the food is eatable or not. By this you will save both money and helping the environment!

Julia Götborg
Comments (3)
  • Lauren M-USA Lauren M-USA Oct. 7, 2013
    I think you've brought up a very interesting topic! I live in Texas in the United States, and we have something very similar to your freshness dates, though they're usually “sell by” or “use by” labels. I found an article similar to yours detailing the amount of food wasted in the US because of these misleading dates; the numbers are incredibly daunting! http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/Masses-of-food-wasted-use-by-dates-mislead-4825974.php
    I never even thought about the dates being wrong, but I'll definitely be more careful about what I throw out! Thanks!
  • Sophy C-USA Sophy C-USA Oct. 7, 2013
    I agree. I'm from California, USA, but my parents are from China. They do not like to waste anything. Usually food is still good a week or two after the date marked. I'm fine with it when it comes to milk and eggs, but sometimes my family can get a little crazy. My grandma cooked me spoiled steak once saying “Oh we put it in the freezer. Its fine” and I find out it was months old. I almost threw up.

    If people are throwing things away the moment they reach the date marked on the food, that is incredibly wasteful
  • Katie Emery Katie Emery Oct. 14, 2013
    Hi Julia, my name is Katie from America. I agree with what you said about the freshness date, making people more inclined to throw away perfectly fine food. The food can usually last a week or more past the date printed on the product; however some people get scared by the fact that the food may be bad, and they will throw it away. You had a good idea with your tip! By using our senses we can determine if the food is good or not, rather than depending on the date printed. By doing this it will cut down on the amount of good food being thrown away and wasted.

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
larsole hetland, Oct. 4, 2013

Hello, my name is Lars Ole. I eat a lot of food, because I train a lot. I eat about 5-6 times a day. If I did not do that, I would not be able to train as much as I do. Therefore, food is very important to my training and me. When I eat all this food, I usually do not think about that many people around the world die of hunger. I can just go into the kitchen and take what I want, and other people have to hunt for their food, for maybe 2-3 hours. Sometimes they don’t even get to eat that day. So that is something to think about.

larsole hetland
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
marcus storli, Oct. 4, 2013

Hi People
Many people in the world are starving. Basically we have enough food to everybody in the world, but it’s still many people that starving. It’s important to do something with this problem. So what can we do, to help other people that have to little food? We rich have very much food and we throw away around 5 bags in the week and we throw away much food. We should be better buy the food we need and not much more, then we eat and then we throw it away.
So in my opinion, rich countries like Norway have to give more food to the poor. And a other way to get more food to the food is to give money. If everybody in Norway, and among rich in the world give little to organisations like reddbarna (a Norway organisations that help poor), then it can help many people.
In many ways, it’s very unfair that we rich have so much more of food and other things and people that are poor. So if people can throw away lesser food, then we can give more food to the poor and it will stop some of the poverty problem in the world.

marcus storli
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Claudia C-USA, Oct. 4, 2013

Hi everybody! I live in the US and this Carbon Footprint Challenge made me more aware of my impact on our awesome world that we live in. Specifically, one of the best things ever: FOOD. Whether it is a juicy steak, a scrumptious hamburger, or some greasy bacon, meat is so desirable for most of us. It is also very difficult imagining a meal without meat… Although meats contain essential nutrients it is also very important to not consume so much. That is why I came up with a cool idea to plan a “Veggie Dinner” once a week or so with your family/friends. This can turn into a fun event, where there could be a competition on who cooks the most delicious Veggie Meal. Also, you can find endless recipes online for Vegetarian meals. Just an idea that some of you conscious consumers might want to consider :)
Happy eating!

Claudia C-USA
Comments (1)
  • Terrence V-USA Terrence V-USA Oct. 4, 2013
    I hate the very thought of eating vegetables, I much prefer my fried chicken and steak. If I have to conform to being environmentally friendly in terms of food and wish not to compromise by eating more green vegetables, I would just stick to tofu as an alternative. I would love to have a “Tofu Dinner” with family and friends one day.
    Happy eating! #colts

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