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Posts tagged "energy efficiency" - Page 6

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Discussions Discussion Reuse & repurpose
Maggie OUSA, Oct. 7, 2013

Hi my name is Maggie and I live in Texas. After doing my carbon footprint calendar I found that most of the light bulbs in my home are incandescent. I decided to switch the incandescent light bulbs out for CFL’s. Also, I will be more aware of when I leave rooms in my home and make sure I turn the lights out behind me.
I also will attach timers to the lights in my bedroom and living room, the lights that I use the most, to make sure I don’t use them more than the necessary amount of time.

Maggie OUSA
Comments (4)
  • Sofia M- United States Sofia M- United States Oct. 8, 2013
    I can relate to this because I didn't realize how much my lighting habits effected my carbon footprint until I calculated it in class a few days ago. Just like Lauren said, I didn't realize how many incandescent bulbs I have in my house. Also, I often leave all the lights on in my house, even in rooms that I am not in. Calculating my carbon footprint really allowed me to see the effects of this for the first time, and I was so surprised because my carbon footprint was significantly higher than my state's average! Thanks for the idea about the timers, that is a great idea that I am going to put into use! This is especially helpful because so many times I forget that I have left the lights on. Lauren's idea about the sensors on the light switches is a good idea too! I found a helpful website comparing different light bulbs and their impact on the environment. http://homeguides.sfgate.com/energyefficient-bulbs-halogen-vs-fluorescent-vs-incandescent-78832.html I also found another helpful website that expresses the impact of light lighting habits on the average carbon footprints. http://www.carbonfootprint.com/lightbulbs.html
  • Laura H-U.S.A Laura H-U.S.A Oct. 9, 2013
    This is a great idea! I understand how hard it is to simply turn the lights off. You are right changing your light-bulbs can really make a difference in your carbon footprint. Like everyone else I don't notice if I leave the lights on when I leave the room. I also think your timer idea is really good too. I think I will try to change my light-bulbs to CFL's to reduce my carbon footprint. If you want to reduce your footprint you can do something as simple as leaving your window open during the summer or using an extra blanket in the winter
  • Taylor G-USA Taylor G-USA Oct. 10, 2013
    Great idea! I also calculated my carbon footprint and also the amount of incandescent bulbs I had in my house, which is all of the light bulbs. It is a really smart idea to put a timer on your lights. At night I usually forget to turn off the lights in the rooms of my house and I am waiting energy. If I had a timer it would help immensely.
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Discussions Discussion Reuse & repurpose
Dipali S-USA, Oct. 7, 2013

I’ve noticed from my carbon footprint, that reusing and recycling was what i was best at. I learned that reusing and recycling is a great way to reduce your carbon footprint, and make the world a better place. I think that in our society today, people are forgetting to reuse and recycle, causing much pollution in the world’s air and oceans. Too much carbon is not healthy for living organisms, and can even cause them to die. If everyone contributed in one way or the other to participate in reusing and recycling, then it can decrease a lot of the carbon produced by us. There are many ways to do this, some simple ways of recycling are: recycle all paper, plastic, cardboard, glass, electronics, clothing, and other recyclable products. There are also many different ways of reusing such as: reusing plastic bags as a lunch bag, using scratch paper for things that don’t require fresh paper, buying recycled paper, using environmental friendly products, drinking water in reusable water bottles instead of plastic bottles, making book covers out of paper bags, etc. If everyone doe at least one of these things (or others not mentioned), then the carbon footprint can easily be decreased.

Dipali S-USA
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Discussions Discussion Reuse & repurpose
Chloe R-USA, Oct. 7, 2013

Most people have reusable bags, but they don’t know what good it is to the environment. And some people who have reusable bags don’t even use them. People also think oh I will be “green” and use paper bag, but paper bags are just as bad a plastic bags. Paper bags come from trees and to make paper bags you have to cut down trees which is bad for the environment

Here are reasons why you should NOT use plastic bags. Plastic bags are not biodegradable, they can take up to 1,000 years to break down. Plastic bags can also get into the ocean very easily and cause harm to marine life. It is amazing how many plastic bags you can save by using a reusable bag. You can save 6 plastic bags a weeks, 24 bags a month, 288 bags a year, and over 22,000 a lifetime.

If one in five people in the USA used reusable bags you could save over 1.3 trillion bags in our lifetime.

http://www.plasticpledge.org/solutions.cfm
Chloe R-USA
Comments (1)
  • Nicci J Nicci J Oct. 17, 2013
    Wow I had never known that it took that long for plastic bags from grocery stores to break down. My mom owns those reusable bags but we always forget to use to them when we go shopping for groceries. I'm going to start trying to remember to keep the reusable bags in the car so we will remember them for often. I will try to reuse Ziploc bags when possible, too! Thanks for sharing!

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Discussions Discussion Reuse & repurpose
Victoria L- USA, Oct. 7, 2013

I think that in today’s society, many items we use everyday we can reuse. Everyday, we use things that can re-used but do not know it. One example is printer paper. After it is used, many people with throw it away or even recycle it. A better way to help the environment could be to re-use the paper. It could be reused by simply flipping the sheet over and using the empty back side to print more on, or printing on both sides of the paper in the first place. Another way to reduce your paper use could be to buy the online/ e-reader version of a book instead of buying the paper version. By reducing the amount of paper we use, we can use less trees for our paper, and reduce the carbon emissions!

Here is a link with more information: http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/living-green/living-green-citizen/reduce-reuse-recycle/reuse-it.html

Victoria L- USA
Comments (1)
  • Rebecca C-USA Rebecca C-USA Oct. 7, 2013
    Printing on the back of used paper is a great idea! My family has recently gotten into the habit of using the back of printer paper for things that do not need to be turned in, like rough drafts of essays or shopping lists, instead of using a whole new sheet. We are using half as much paper and wasting so much less.

    Using an e-reader version of a book is also a good idea. At my public library, there are actually e-books you can check out on a Kindle or Nook, which saves them from having to buy a lot of actual book, which reduces the use of paper by a substantial amount, especially because libraries have to buy many copies of a book. According to one website, book production results in the harvesting of 125 million trees in just one year. So any by using any e-book, one less book has to be manufactured. It is a great way to reduce your carbon footprint!

    http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/08/31/are-e-readers-greener-than-books/?_r=0

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Discussions Discussion Energy Efficient Appliances
Kylee S-USA, Oct. 7, 2013

Energy Efficient Appliances
The US Department of Energy created a system called Energy Star to point out all home appliances that are the most energy efficient and create better air quality and less utility bills. Most of the Energy Star appliances can cost about 40% more than regular household appliances, but use half the energy and help protect the environment. Although most appliances look the same on the outside, the energy efficient models are made up of parts that require less energy of lose less energy than the normal model.
Since the Energy Star appliances cost much more than normal appliances, most people aren’t willing to spend the extra money because they can’t envision it saving them money in the future. If you just buy a normal appliances here are some ways you can reduce your energy bill each month:
-Arrange your kitchen so the refrigerator is not near vents or stoves or other heat sources
because then it won’t have to work extra to keep it cool.
-Vacuum the refrigerator coils to remove build up, which will reduce the energy needed.
-Cook on a stove top with pots that fit the burners properly, that way food will cook faster
and at a lower burner setting, which will save energy.
If you think of any other ideas please share!

http://naturalpapa.com/home/energy-efficient-versus-traditional-appliances-whats-the-difference/
Kylee S-USA
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Discussions Discussion Reuse & repurpose
Will H-USA, Oct. 7, 2013

In my opinion, it isn’t what we do with our plastic or paper when we are done with it that matters, really. The real problem is why we produce so many products that cannot be used again and again, or using resources that pollute our world. Now these sort of issues will not be resolved in the near future… so what we can do is use our knowledge and imagination to think outside of the box in order to reuse and reduce what we have and what we are going to use. Sites like this: http://www.realsimple.com/home-organizing/20-more-ways-to-reuse-old-plastic-paper-bags-10000001088458/index.html are great tools to use in order to manageably reduce our footprints in the long run. Creativity is our best tools as ever learning and adapting people.

http://www.realsimple.com/home-organizing/20-more-ways-to-reuse-old-plastic-paper-bags-10000001088458/index.html
Will H-USA
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Discussions Discussion Reuse & repurpose
Caite R-USA, Oct. 7, 2013

I’m sure all of us have thrown away scraps of paper recently, whether it has been notebook paper, index cards, or copy paper. You may or may not know this, but you can actually make your own paper out of those scraps! I recently found a website that shows you a procedure to make your own paper. That’s pretty cool! I can take about 20,000 trees to make a Saturday edition of a big city newspaper, which is equivalent to more than a million trees a year! You can use the recycled paper to make things such as greeting cards or letters to write to your family. So before you go and spend money and waste trees on new paper, try to make your own!

http://www.ecokids.ca/pub/fun_n_games/printables/activities/assets/science_nature/paper_making.pdf
Caite R-USA
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Discussions Discussion Reuse & repurpose
Anna C-USA, Oct. 7, 2013

While many of us know about the common things we can recycle (paper, plastic, glass), there are so many other things that we can recycle to reduce our carbon footprint.

Technology is a majorly controversial topic when looking at carbon emissions. Here on Einzstein, there is even a discussion group about whether technology is a want or a need. Many students have expressed that they believe upgrading to the newest technology is not a need based purchase and should be avoided. However, if you do upgrade your phone or device, you can still attempt to reduce your carbon footprint while doing so. Technology can be recycled, and in more ways than one! Many companies accept used devices, including Goodwill and Verizon (http://www.verizonwireless.com/b2c/splash/electronicdevicerecycling.jsp), so that when someone needs a new device, rather than purchasing a new one, they can have your used one. Technology that cannot be reused can also be recycled. These devices are either refurbished to be able to be used again, or recycled for their steel.

Recycling your clothes can help reduce your carbon footprint too. You can not only hand your clothes down to a sibling or even refurbish them for yourself, but donate them to places like Goodwill, Salvation Army, charities, or local thrift shops. According to the Secondary Materials and Recycled Textile Assn, 45% of recycled clothes are sold to other countries, 30% are turned into cleaning rags, and 25% are turned into fibers for stuffing or insulation. Many clothing companies (including Levi, Gap, and Patagonia) use recycled clothes as well. Patagonia spokeswoman Jen Rapp says that recycling clothes, rather than making them from raw material, saves 72% in energy costs and 76% in CO2 emissions. Clothing recycling really can make a huge difference because the plastic that is used in textiles saves 57% of the energy used to make them from virgin materials, or about 1 ton of CO2 emissions for every ton that is recycled (according to the Natural Resources Defense Council). See the link attached to this post for more information on the opportunities and effects of recycling clothes.

So if buying less technology and clothes to reduce your carbon footprint is “off the table” for you, you can still help to reduce carbon emission even globally by recycling your old devices and apparel.

For more information on things you didn’t know you could recycle, see the link below.
http://www.greenamerica.org/pubs/greenamerican/articles/21Things.cfm

http://articles.latimes.com/2010/mar/21/image/la-ig-clothesrecycling-20100321
Anna C-USA
Comments (5)
  • Anna C-USA Anna C-USA Oct. 9, 2013
    Caite – I love your link for making your own paper! It uses such common items that many of us most likely already have in our own homes. Making your own paper looks like a long process, but it could be a fun project to do with family or friends. The best part is that if you don’t have the time, energy, or dedication to make your own paper, you can easily make sure to recycle your paper, technology, clothes, and many other commonly used items. Here is a great list of things that can be recycled – from cardboard to light bulbs! http://www.buffalo.edu/recycling/recyclable.html

    Justin – Those are such great ideas for recycling electronics and clothes. There must be so many amazing things that could be done with an old cell phone, rather than throwing it out. Sending hand-me-downs to relatives is an easy and kind way to help the environment. It’s a bonus not only for your carbon footprint, but for your family too! I agree, even though clothes and technology aren’t the first thing that comes to mind when we are told to recycle more, they can really make a difference too. The more things we can recycle, the better. Check out the link (above) to see a complete list with a broad range of recyclable items – from the common to the not so common.
  • Anna C-USA Anna C-USA Oct. 9, 2013
    Caite – I love your link for making your own paper! It uses such common items that many of us most likely already have in our own homes. Making your own paper looks like a long process, but it could be a fun project to do with family or friends. The best part is that if you don’t have the time, energy, or dedication to make your own paper, you can easily make sure to recycle your paper, technology, clothes, and many other commonly used items. Here is a great list of things that can be recycled – from cardboard to light bulbs! http://www.buffalo.edu/recycling/recyclable.html

    Justin – Those are such great ideas for recycling electronics and clothes. There must be so many amazing things that could be done with an old cell phone, rather than throwing it out. Sending hand-me-downs to relatives is an easy and kind way to help the environment. It’s a bonus not only for your carbon footprint, but for your family too! I agree, even though clothes and technology aren’t the first thing that comes to mind when we are told to recycle more, they can really make a difference too. The more things we can recycle, the better. Check out the link (above) to see a complete list with a broad range of recyclable items – from the common to the not so common.
  • Justin A-USA Justin A-USA Oct. 10, 2013
    Anna: That list seems pretty comprehensive and useful. The visual guides often seen near bins that tell what materials go in which bin are useful too, but sometimes they're confusing because they sacrifice detail for simplicity. Having a list in text form helps to clear things up.

    Reusing electronics like old phones really appeals to me too. It has a clear advantage over just recycling, too, because even if you reuse a phone in a personal project, you still get to recycle it afterward, so its materials still get put to full use.
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Discussions Discussion Reuse & repurpose
Lauren H - USA, Oct. 6, 2013

After I had heard about up-cycling and reusing old products, I remembered that I had a friend that used to make “capri-sun purses” and donate them to less fortunate girls. She basically took her empty juice pouches and taped them together; then she added a handle on top and she had a purse that was ready to donate!

I think this is a great way of reusing an old item, especially since the juice pouches would just go to a landfill if they weren’t reused. If everyone started doing this, or at least started up cycling and reusing old items, many people’s carbon footprints would decrease.
Here’s a link on how to make a capri sun purse:
http://m.wikihow.com/Make-a-Capri-Sun-Purse
What are your thoughts on this crafty way to re-use an otherwise useless item?

Lauren H - USA
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Discussions Discussion Reuse & repurpose
Lauren L-USA, Oct. 6, 2013

After seeing a few posts about upcycling, I decided to check it out and do some research on it for myself. It’s really interesting that you can don’t even to put that old glass bottle in the recycling bin. You can just re-purpose it by using it as a hanging light pendant! You can even turn all those old CD spindles into bagel holders. Who knew there were so many interesting uses for everyday things.

http://worldinsidepictures.com/25-creative-ways-to-repurpose-reuse-old-stuff/
Lauren L-USA
Comments (1)
  • Cameron M- United States Cameron M- United States Oct. 10, 2013
    I like your link! I love seeing all of the unique ways to upcycle old items. It's really cool that you can take something so old and useless and turn it into something completely new. It really encourages people to recycle their items and transform it instead of throwing it away and wasting things. Not only is it an efficient way to save items, but it is also a really fun and crafty project!

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