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Posts tagged "carbon footprint" - Page 45

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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Linnea A_Ek11, Oct. 3, 2013

I always thought that I was quiet environmentally friendly. I turn of the water when I brush my teeth, I sort my garbage and I composts. But after calculating my footprint I have come to realize that a change have to occur in my daily life. The average for a person in Sweden is 7305 kg of CO₂ per year and I got 11921 kg. What do I have to do to improve my result? What do we have to improve?

Linnea A_Ek11
Comments (1)
  • Terrence V-USA Terrence V-USA Oct. 3, 2013
    There are a lot of factors that contribute to your carbon footprint other than your two examples. For instance, how often do you shower each week and for how long? Are you a heavy shopper? Do you travel a lot by car or plane? You should look back at your results for the other categories and you'll find out why you're CO2 emissions are higher than your country's average. As for improvement for your country as a whole, the best thing you can do is to spread awareness to everyone you know and hope they will change their ways as well in order to be more environmentally friendly. I hope this helps and good luck with lowering your carbon footprint.

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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Ryan P-USA, Oct. 1, 2013

Hello everyone, my name is Ryan and I live in Oakland, California in the United States.

I am very interested in ways to reduce carbon emissions and increase sustainability in cities and towns, especially by means of finding renewable energy sources. If I were a city planner focused on sustainability, I would devote my attention towards clean transportation fuels and green generation of electricity. I believe these are the main sources of the high greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere. Additionally, if we could find better methods to create electricity without burning fossil fuels and to travel to places without gasoline or aviation fuel, we would be heading the right direction towards a sustainable and clean future. However, if we continue to consume these materials, we will not only deplete Earth’s resources, but also pollute the planet tremendously. Thus, it is better to find alternatives now before we are desperately scraping the Earth for resources or struggling to clean the air.

Recently, I have had a growing interest in biofuels, and I happened upon this article regarding the production of biofuel by feeding sugar to E. coli bacteria. At the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), some chemical engineers figured out how to modify glycolysis, a process some organisms undergo to convert sugar into molecules the cells need. The researchers’ method of creating this biofuel emits no carbon dioxide, which is less than the two carbon dioxide molecules current biorefineries emit every time glycolysis occurs. When considering the millions of cells emitting two carbon dioxide molecules, it becomes obvious how much cleaner and more economical this customized glycolysis procedure is. This production of biofuel is completely efficient because no carbon dioxide is lost, but is instead conserved and used in the process of converting organic material into fuel. This is a quintessential example of how we are striving towards a sustainable future by advancing existing fuel technologies rather than simply conserving resources (though that is also good). The efficiency improvements also show how much closer we are to getting to long-lasting, proficient energy sources. Though we may be a long ways away from everlasting energy, finding methods to increase efficiency in biofuels is a great start, and the fact that they are clean is great, too!

A city with this biofuel (or other efficient fuels) would be clean and sustainable. I would want to live in an area where the pollution is not hovering above me in a musky, suffocating cloud and where I am conscious that future generations can continue to enjoy the Earth that we have today. However, this article brings up an interesting question: clean fuels can only be so efficient to a certain extent. When that point is reached, what will we turn to? Solar panels? Or will we continue consuming, just at a slower rate?

http://www.rdmag.com/news/2013/10/new-metabolic-pathway-more-efficiently-converts-sugars-biofuels
Ryan P-USA
Comments (7)
  • JohnRobert W-USA JohnRobert W-USA Oct. 3, 2013
    Would this bio-fuel idea apply to airplanes? My footprint was above average only because of our plane flights. If this idea applied to airplanes, how big would the impact be? Theoretically?
  • Jason Hodin Jason Hodin Oct. 3, 2013
    Airplanes are a real problem. You have to get a super heavy thing to move against gravity and get airborne. This means that the fuel has to burn EXTREMELY hot. Yes, there is research into so-called “second generation biofuels” that cn reduce airline emissions by like 50% or more per passenger over petrooleum based jet fuel.

    Qantas has a good web site that talks about what other factors are being discussed and researched related to increasing efficiency. This includes things that you can do when planning a flight:

    http://www.qantas.com.au/travel/airlines/fuel/global/en
  • adrian a-usa adrian a-usa Oct. 3, 2013
    we should have this type of bio fuel with also functioning solar panels and self charging battery on the car, so while the car runs, it charges
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Discussions Discussion Wants or needs?
Stefanie F-USA, Oct. 1, 2013

Having a phone now a days is a necessity but you don’t necessarily need the newest model of iPhone. Having a iPhone 4 isn’t the worst thing in the world. i would know; i have one. When you a cell phone is made it only increases the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Just stick with the cell phone you have; it won’t kill you.

Stefanie F-USA
Comments (3)
  • Kamelia R-USA Kamelia R-USA Oct. 1, 2013
    I approve your statement because it doesn't matter how old your phone is, as long as it works for calling and writing messages, you're OK. We don't need the newest phones just because they're prettier or have one more cool sport like face calling. There are actually many people who have the same phone for 2-3 years or until they stop working.
  • Marcus H Noreg Marcus H Noreg Oct. 3, 2013
    I used to think of my iPhone as much more than just my phone. I also have the iPhone 4, but it is getting a bit old now, and both sides are broken. I only use it as a regular phone now (calling and texting), and I have found out that I don't need the other stuff. I will be sticking to my phone for a while longer until it brakes totally down.
  • Anthony B Anthony B Oct. 3, 2013
    The cell phone that you might have could still be in production and still could be being made. You would need to have a whole lot of people to boycott the cell phones for them to stop producing them.

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Will H-USA, Oct. 1, 2013

After taking the Carbon Footprint Survey and seeing my own footprint in comparison to the people around me, I have found that my personal high, or the one aspect that is especially higher than others, is my meat consumption. Now thinking about it briefly, it does not seem like eating a lot of meat makes that much of a difference against categories such as air travel and electricity use, but after some research, it is quite the contrary. Michelle Maisto reports on this topic, and one paragraph stands out in particular:
“A widely cited 2006 report estimated that 18% of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions were attributable to cattle, buffalo, sheep, goats, camels, pigs and poultry. However, analysis performed by Goodland, with co-writer Jeff Anhang, an environmental specialist at the World Bank Group’s International Finance Corporation, found that figure to now more accurately be 51%.”
This leads me to contemplate our nation’s (USA) obsession with meat and animal products. I wonder, if a policy were put in place to limit, or at least put regulations on the treatment of animal care, how much could our carbon footprint be reduced?
That brings me to a different topic regarding world hunger. I am not well versed in world policy, but if money were to be relocated toward grain production, instead of livestock, could that potentially help to make a dent in the world hunger crisis?

http://www.forbes.com/sites/michellemaisto/2012/04/28/eating-less-meat-is-worlds-best-chance-for-timely-climate-change-say-experts/
Will H-USA
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
matteo rodondi, May 29, 2013

hi guys my name is matteo and i live in italy.
We have enough food to feed everyone in the world. World hunger is a problem that doesn’t need to exist. This is a much bigger immediate problem than one’s carbon footprint. but it’s possible remove the hunger from the world? have any ideas?

matteo rodondi
Comments (2)
  • Lauren M-USA Lauren M-USA Oct. 8, 2013
    I agree that world hunger is a huge issue throughout the world. So far, I don't think anyone has really come up with any long-lasting solution to hunger, either. Of course, there is the idea of increasing food production, but then there is the issue of distribution, growing space, etc. I did find a rather interesting article, however, that talks about how hunger is directly related to poverty, and in order to solve world hunger, we have to first look at solving poverty. I think this is pretty accurate; if we were able to lift people out of poverty, they would eventually have the means to provide their own food and world hunger would decrease. It isn't a flawless idea by any means, but it's definitely interesting in its own right.

    http://www.globalissues.org/article/8/solving-world-hunger-means-solving-world-poverty
  • Paige Savard Paige Savard Oct. 14, 2013
    I agree with both of your statements. There is definitely a direct relationship between poverty and world hunger. The less money one tends to have, the less food they will be able to consume because they simply cannot afford it. In order to help the hungry there must be a dramatic change in the distribution of wealth that is still a problem to this day. There also tends to be a direct relationship with wealth and one's carbon footprint. The wealthier someone tends to be, the more resources they have financial access to and will be able to afford cars, new technology, large houses and much more that all burns a supplement amount of carbon. It is just a matter of starting the process in helping the hungry, and even though there are great efforts to help, there could definitely be a better attempt or greater actions to help the ones in need.

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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
matteo rodondi, May 29, 2013

hi guys i’m matteo and i live in italy!
I recycle my trash and I think it is a necessary job for every citizen. But many people in their daily life don’t have time to wash glass or plastic bottles and remove their labels off or they are to lazy to put glass, paper and plastic into different bags or just to find recycling containers outside. this attitude has to be changed if we want to have our earth clean.

matteo rodondi
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Discussions Discussion Wants or needs?
Davide c, May 29, 2013

Hi!
My name is Davide C,I think that the pollution of the city is very large. To reduce this pollution engineers and architects are working to implement projects for the houses to 0 impact, this is very important to at least partly reduce this source of pollution, I think that in the future many will realize that these houses and all the resources are inexhaustible really important for the future life.

Davide c
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Discussions Discussion Wants or needs?
Davide c, May 29, 2013

Hi ! My name is Davide C, I think the problem of pollution is very dangerous for the man and the vegetation. I think so for eliminate this problem everyone we must become more responsible, we must divide the dirt especially plastic, glass and paper. We must help the environment because it’s too important for our life and the future life.

Davide c
Comments (1)
  • Daniella B-California Daniella B-California Oct. 1, 2013
    I strongly agree with what you are saying. I think that everyone should do their part as human beings on this wonderful earth, to keep it clean. If no one takes the time to keep our world safe and healthy then, nothing good will come of that.

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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Alessandro C, May 29, 2013

Hi guys!
I live in a small village in the mountains in the north of Italy named Edolo. Here we use hydroelectric energy and for heat my house I use a lot of diesel oil. I use to heating my house for six month per year because from October to march the temperatures are really cold. I’d like to install many solar panels in my house for reduce pollution. My village isn’t big and there aren’t any factories so the pollution isn’t very high. I think the pollution in the big cities is an important problem that can be resolved with some little sacrifices from people that live in these cities.

Alessandro C
Comments (1)
  • Lauren M-USA Lauren M-USA Oct. 8, 2013
    I definitely agree with you about how pollution from big cities is becoming a major issue. I live in Texas and I know that Houston and Dallas both release huge amounts of carbon into the air each year, and that's definitely something we should look at finding solutions to; the solar panels are a really creative idea! I also find it interesting that you are used to colder temperatures. In Texas, we actually rely on air-conditioning about 9 months of the year, and I wish that ould somehow be reduced as well.

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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Josh Jenkins, May 22, 2013

My name is Josh I’m from Mooresville NC and I am 16 years old. My footprint was average mine came from traveling a lot. I thought it was gonna be above average. I was surprised that a lot of it came from traveling I thought maybe it would have came from all my tvs and stuff like that

Josh Jenkins
Comments (6)
  • Giovanni Aponte Giovanni Aponte May 22, 2013
    same lot came form tv and fhone and light from home
  • Andrew E Andrew E Oct. 3, 2013
    I think that traveling is a big part of a lot of citizens lives so I am not surprised so much came from transportation. If you fly a lot maybe you could instead carpool or take a bus so that you can cut down your carbon footprint.
  • darrin b darrin b Oct. 3, 2013
    I think that you could cut down on traveling a little to help cut back
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