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Posts tagged "lifestyle" - Page 4

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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Rylie B-USA, Oct. 10, 2013

While looking at my carbon footprint, I noticed that I contribute most in the “Home” section. I believe this is because my family has a tendency to leave electronics, such as laptops and TVs, on and plugged in. Also, the typical length of a shower at my house is around 45 minutes. By changing my habits for these two things, I could lower my carbon footprint easily.
For the electronics section, I could simply turn things off when I’m not using them. Especially the fans and lights in my house, since those are left on the most. I will also take shorter showers.

Rylie B-USA
Comments (1)
  • Briana Slade Briana Slade Dec. 23, 2013
    My family also has a tendency to leave lights on and electronics plugged in to. I think everybody should better there ways. I don't disagree with your family taking 45 minuete showers, I just think they might just wanna be clean and make sure that there clean.

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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Reece V, USA, Oct. 10, 2013

All of us have committed the crime of using a vehicle unnecessarily. Whether it’s driving down the street to your friend’s house or driving a block to school, we’ve all been there. Cars use up so much gas and emit it into our communities. Not only is the exhaust from our cars bad for our environment, but the gas prices are very expensive and keep rising. Did you know that the average American spends over 2,000 dollars just to fill up their tank? Ways to stop wasting so much money on gas is to carpool. I have a carpool with three other people for school. Also, instead of driving that one block to your friend’s house, walk or ride a bike. It’s just a block after all. I guarantee that all these little things add up and make a difference.

Reece V, USA
Comments (2)
  • Anna E-USA Anna E-USA Oct. 10, 2013
    Wow! I never realized how much we spend on gas. Carpooling is a great idea! That can definitely help to reduce your carbon footprint.
  • Bridey F-United States Bridey F-United States Oct. 11, 2013
    Gas is so important in our world today! we use it for almost everything. Great ideas Reece!

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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Angela L-USA, Oct. 10, 2013

A large portion of my carbon footprint was from home and my showers. I personally love the feeling of being clean. Therefore, it is essential to shower daily. Especially when I get home from practice. Also, being from Houston, it is really hot and on some days you just sweat without any physical activity. I love taking long showers and they have to be really hot. Some days, I can take short showers - around 15 minutes. But then on other days, I just stand in the shower for about an hour. I know it’s a waste of water, but I need to have the feeling of being clean. My question is ‘Is there a way to feel really clean without taking long showers?’

Angela L-USA
Comments (2)
  • Elena D-USA Elena D-USA Oct. 17, 2013
    Hi Angela! I love to take long showers too, but taking long showers can be taxing on our water supply. Cutting your 15 minute shower five minutes shorter can save thousands of gallons of water every year. It also helps to lower your water bill. Water is limited and taking shorter showers can really benefit our environment.
  • Kaylena Principe Kaylena Principe Oct. 18, 2013
    Hi Angela! I understand when you say you love taking long showers! The warm and awesome water is completely calming to me. I usually take 15-20 minute showers. my suggestion for you would be to just scrub away. Because in reality it only takes about 5 or ten minutes to get your body scrubbed and clean. I do understand the time it takes us girls to shower. We have other things to do such as shave. And use conditioner! AND FACEWASH! But i think you just need to be efficient. If you just sort of rush yourself, it pays off. Shower with Purpose! i like to say. If every action you have has a purpose, i guarantee that it will cut your shower in half. I'm also willing to bet that you're the type of person who likes to stand in the shower and let the water just run over you. AND THAT ALRIGHT. but i suggest you might wanna cut that down because if you just take your shower and get yourself clean you'll save yourself a ton of time! And it will help the environment by a lot! I HOPE THIS HELPED! And feel free to ask me anymore questions! Have a good day!

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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Angelina A-US, Oct. 10, 2013

Why is the immediate cost of eco-friendly appliances so much higher than that of standard appliances? CFL light bulbs are cheaper in the long run than incandescent, but people don’t see that, they just see that they have to pay $15 per bulb. People should work on bringing these costs down so that people are more inclined to buy the environmentally friendly products. Would people not be more inclined to “go green” if it was not so expensive to them?

http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/translating-uncle-sam/stories/cfl-vs-incandescent-battle-of-the-bulb
Angelina A-US
Comments (5)
  • Angelina A-US Angelina A-US Oct. 11, 2013
    I agree with both of you, but at the same time, people do not realize the efficiency of CFL at the time of purchase.
  • Elena D-USA Elena D-USA Oct. 17, 2013
    I agree with you Angelina. The price oh each light bulb is a deciding factor on whether or not the consumer should buy it. They may know that CFL bulbs save energy but they don't know that it can also save them more money in the long run, especially when it comes to the electric bill. CFL bulbs last longer and are brighter than incandescent bulbs. I think more people should know about the benefits of CFL bulbs.
  • Kaylena Principe Kaylena Principe Oct. 18, 2013
    Hi Anna! Thank you so much for this post! This helps me understand the reason as to why there aren't that many CFL bulbs in my household. I do understand the fact as to why not many people use this bulbs in their houses. They are expensive and some people just dont have the money to pay for these right now. But i think that these people should just save up for it because they help you sp much in the long run by saving the money that would have been used by re buying the same incandesant lightbulbs over and over again. I will definitely be proposing this to my parents.

    One question i do have though is, how do we get people to buy these bulbs because some people dont have the money right in front of them. Some people arent born with that luxury.. So what would you suggest..? Should we allow them to maybe buy one every month or so..? I think that would be a mkre efficent way to do things so then you have time to make the the money that youre spending at the moment. And eventually you'll get to the place of having all CFL bulbs in your household. BUT I Am not sure if this is the efficent way to do things or what not. I would love to have your feedback! Sincerely, Kaylena Principe - USA
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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Zehra J-USA, Oct. 10, 2013

As I was looking at my carbon footprints and comparing it to others, I noticed some trends about the carbon emissions. Transportation, particularly air travel, seemed to be a major contributor of carbon in the carbon footprints. I also looked at my own carbon footprint and tried to analyze what I could do to reduce it. I know that many people won’t be willing to make some drastic changes in their lives, such as eliminating air travel all together, just for the sake of reducing carbon emissions, but there are still small changes that can be made to reduce carbon foot prints in the long run. I know that I, personally, am willing to make a few changes to my life that will reduce my carbon foot print.

Carbon emissions coming from transportation can be reduced in many ways. Carpooling is a great way to reduce carbon emissions coming from traveling to and from school. Road trips are a great alternative to air travel within the same country or region. Combining trips can also reduce carbon emissions as well as taking non-stop flights when air travel is necessary.

I also noticed that the carbon emissions that occurred at home were also pretty high. Electricity is also one of the big contributors to carbon emissions. Compound Fluorescent Light bulbs, or CFL bulbs, reduce 2/3 the amount of energy that the regular incandescent use. Creating new habits such as turning of lights or other electronic devices when not in use can also reduce carbon emissions. Water can be conserved by installing low-flow toilets and water-conserving showers.

Carbon emissions that come from food can also be reduced. Making sure that food is not wasted is a way to reduce carbon emissions. Making reasonable purchases about food can save carbon and money, too.

Carbon emissions from purchases can be reduced by being reasonable when making purchases. Deciding whether it is a want or a need can help when deciding whether it’s a reasonable purchase. When purchases are made, you can recycle the boxes, bags or other disposable items.

Also, keep in mind the three R’s: reduce, reuse and recycle. Following these guidelines can help lead to more “green” lifestyle. Reducing your carbon footprint is the first step to helping the environment and should really be encouraged.

http://www.carbonfund.org/reduce
Zehra J-USA
Comments (1)
  • Jason Hodin Jason Hodin Oct. 10, 2013
    in air travel, if you try to fly non-stop that saves carbon two ways:
    1) take off & landing has the biggest fuel use, so the more stops on the way the more carbon
    2) when you have stops, you usuallky fly at least a bit out of the way— the path is less direct. This adds time in the air and thus more fuel.

    Therefore, if you try to prioritize non-stop flights (or the fewest syops possible) this will save quite a bit of carbon.

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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Alia Nitake, Oct. 10, 2013

My carbon footprint is about 13,000 kg more than the average American. For me, transportation is where I put out the most carbon. I live about 50 miles from my school and I take the bus every day, twice a day. That, on top of my traveling and weekend activities, adds up to be a lot. The average person’s footprint in my region is 9727 kg, mine is 11883 kg in total. I estimated my footprint would be a lot less than that. I was shocked to see how high my number was.

Alia Nitake
Comments (6)
  • Elin Lundberg Elin Lundberg Oct. 10, 2013
    Hello!I live in Sweden and the average footprint in Sweden is 7305 kg per year but my average footprint is 9416 kg per year. As you can see my footrpint is quite high. The most ordinary in Sweden is that your food is the thing that makes the highest footprint and for me food is the highest to. Maybe it is beacuse in my family we eat a lot of meat and a lot of other families in sweden does that too. In transportion i have just a little bit higher footprint than the average swedish, and i actually think that i am doing quite good at this, since i am always taking the bike and then the train to school. My home is the thing that mostly make my footrpint much higher than the average swedish and maybe that is beacause i have quite a big house with a lot of lamps and maybe it is not so good to use gas to warm up the house, i actually dont know. I actually have one thing that is lower than the average swedish and that is purchases, that feels good.
  • Alexander Midlöv Alexander Midlöv Oct. 10, 2013
    I think that you should turn of your lamps Elin and the problem will be probably solved! (y)
  • Briana Slade Briana Slade Dec. 23, 2013
    I think that you might wanna consider switching schools if your school is 50 miles away from your house. Is that even still in your district? Possibly if you switch schools and travel less that could bring down your carbon footprint because you ride the bus everyday
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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Angela L-USA, Oct. 9, 2013

Transportation, for me, was the category where I put out the most carbon. I am not old enough to drive, so my mom has to take me to school and then go the opposite direction to work. I didn’t realize exactly how much I drove until recently we got rid of an old car. The car was 11-years-old. The odometer read about 230,000 miles when we gave it away. That is a little less that 21,000 miles every year that we had the car. I know that with the new car, it will be only slightly less. My sister is off at college so my mom doesn’t have to drive her around any more, which should take make the average miles per year decrease. Are there any ways that I can put out less carbon through my transportation without having to drive less?

Angela L-USA
Comments (1)
  • Rylie B-USA Rylie B-USA Oct. 10, 2013
    Many countries use railroad transport systems, which offer affordable (and in some cases, free) transportation to the public. This would both lessen the traffic on freeways and transport even larger amounts of people (approx. 200-300 people per trip, maybe even more)! In addition to this many railroad systems use environment friendly energy sources, such as wind and solar energy. I believe that if the USA were to invest on this, it would be a great solution to all the congested highways and carbon emissions! What do you think of this?

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Lily C, Oct. 9, 2013

My carbon footprint is much higher than the average human and American because I live in two different places. My parents are divorced; therefor I have different answers for different questions. I had to put the added up amount from both of my parents’ houses. Transportation was my main issue because I had to add the distances between both of my parents’ house so the amount would really be cut in half per week. I was shocked when I found out that I use 27777 kg of carbon just for transportation. All of the other subjects were right on track so I think I really need to find a better way for transportation. My total footprint is 37876 kg per year compared to the average American of 9727 kg per year.

Lily C
Comments (5)
  • Oscar Brönmark Riex Oscar Brönmark Riex Oct. 10, 2013
    @Lina Eriksson

    Congratulations Lina, you're destroying the planet. Are you satisfied with this? you really need to change your habits.

    As a fellow swede i use about 4000 less kg/year than you do and we pratcically live at the same place. Cant you change your habits, for the sake of the planet.
  • Lina Eriksson Lina Eriksson Oct. 10, 2013
    Oscar, shut up. I am a perfect human being and I don't need your opinion.
  • Claire Redfield Claire Redfield Oct. 14, 2013
    Hi Lina! I'm Claire and I live in Pennsylvania in the United States. My averages are actually less than my area's average, which I think is strange because I don't think of myself as living a sustainable life! My transportation is 938 kg, which is very low compared to the average probably because I don't travel a lot. I live very close to my school and don't go on vacation a lot. My home energy is 6850 kg compared to the average of 7026 kg, so I am not too far off from that. My food emission is 2460 kg, which is pretty low compared to my area's average of 3739 kg. This is strange to me because I don't eat a lot of organic food, so I would think it would be higher. My one emission that is higher is my purchases, which is 738 kg compared to 623 kg. This could be because I have a lot of electronic devices, and I buy new instead of used clothes mostly. It makes sense that your numbers would be higher than average because of using wood, but if it's the cheapest way to heat a home that would be hard to change to a different source.
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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Rebecca C-USA, Oct. 9, 2013

Hi! I’m Rebecca and I’m from Texas! My carbon footprint was 19509 kg of CO₂ per year. Though this is less than the average of 24300 kg per year in my state, it is significantly higher than the average of 3791 kg worldwide.

The lowest portion of my carbon footprint was Purchases, with 744 kg of CO₂ per year. This hardly surprised me; I do not shop much, and when my family goes to the store, we use reusable grocery bags, so not much waste is produced from that.

My carbon footprint for Food is 3093 kg per year. It is much lower than the average in my region, which is over 5500 kg. This is also unsurprising because my family eats a lot more vegetarian, chicken, or fish based meals, and rarely any with red meat or beef. The meals we eat are the cause of about 5-6 kg of carbon per meal, whereas meals with red meat or beef only release about 22 kg of carbon (measurements from http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/es702969f).

Transportation was my second highest, at 3658 kg. I actually expected it to be higher because I live about 25 kilometers away from my school, and I have to drive about 30 minutes to school for five days a week. This might have been because I carpool with four others to and from school. Also, I haven’t taken any long road trips or travelled in an airplane for the past couple of years.

Like many others, the largest portion of my carbon footprint was Home, which I expected, because of the large amounts of electronics my family uses. What I did not anticipate was how much carbon it used. I have a carbon footprint of 12014 kg of CO₂ per year in Home, which makes up over half my entire carbon footprint. I know that my family is constantly using electronics such as phones, TVs, and computers. Most of my schoolwork is on the computer. Just using the computer produces about 100 grams of carbon per hour. Additionally, I tend to take long, hot showers, and I leave the lights on in most rooms, especially when home alone.

Since the biggest cause of my carbon production was in my home, I plan to consciously turn off unused lights, turn off the AC when no one is really hot, and taking showers that are much shorter than my usual 45 minute ones. Does anyone have any other ideas as to what I can do to reduce the size of my carbon footprint?

http:// http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/es702969f
Rebecca C-USA
Comments (1)
  • Sarah G-USA Sarah G-USA Oct. 9, 2013
    Home is also the largest portion of my carbon footprint. I am planning on turning of the lights and television after I leave the room, taking hsorter showers, not leave the water running while I brush my teeth, shut down my laptop and phone instead of leaving them on “standby”, and unplugging my electronics when they are fully charged. Hopefully that helps!

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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Reece V, USA, Oct. 9, 2013

Wasting water is something us humans tend to do often. We do it without even realizing it, and each year we waste more and more water. I’ve done some research and here are some facts that I have discovered.

1. Americans now use more than 127% more water than we did in 1950.
2. About 95% of the water entering our homes goes down the drain.
3. Running the tap while brushing your teeth can waste up to 4 gallons.
4. 5.Leaky faucets that drip at the rate of one drop per second can waste up to 2,700 gallons of water each year.
5. About five gallons of water is used in the shower per minute. This means that a 10 minute shower uses 50 gallons of water.

To sum it all up, thousands of gallons of water is wasted daily. There are ways to help stop the growth of water wasting. While you brush your teeth, turn off the tap. For your shower, consider getting a timed shower head. If you don’t want to do that, when shaving your legs, turn off the water. There are many other ways that you can easily help stop the spread of water wasting.

Reece V, USA
Comments (1)
  • Naina Asaravala Naina Asaravala Oct. 20, 2013
    Hi Reece,
    This post made me think about how me and my family use water. It saddens me that so much water is going down the drain just because someone didn't turn off a sink all the way, or because people just want to stand in a shower for a long time. I am usually very aware of how much water I am using - I always turn off the tap when brushing my teeth, and I only flush when it is necessary. I am hoping to get my family to watch how much water they are using as well, and after that, maybe my friends and neighbors. Hopefully others will try to be aware and reduce the amount of water they use each day.

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