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Posts tagged "world hunger" - Page 2

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Elana S-USA, Oct. 11, 2013

Not only are the types of food we eat and the way we produce food damaging to the environment, the amount of food wasted is causing hunger, suffering, and unnecessary harm to the environment.

Most food that is thrown away in western countries is not bad or rotten, but fresh and edible, simply unwanted. Researcher Tristram Stuart estimates that the United States has two times as much food than it actually needs to feed the population. When the amount of food edible by humans that is used to feed livestock is included, the U.S has four times as much food as it needs.

With an abundance of food, why do people in the United States still go hungry?

We have no need to increase food production. We cut down forests, produce fossil fuels, and harm the environment in numerous ways to produce more and more food, yet we are throw away so much of it. We are reaching the ecological limits of the U S.

There is NO need for hunger. The U.S has 4 times more food than it needs to feed the population; we do not have a quantity problem, but a distribution problem.

Earth cannot sustain these conditions for much longer. Food production, waste, and distribution MUST change.

http://www.ted.com/talks/tristram_stuart_the_global_food_waste_scandal.html
Elana S-USA
Comments (2)
  • Karina L-USA Karina L-USA Oct. 11, 2013
    Elana, this is a great post and link! I completely agree that it it unnecessary to produce more food even though the world will need more and more food to feed the growing generation. Each year, one- third of food produced in the world is lost or waste. Not only is this an economic waste, but the resources used to raise, processing, distribute, and market the food is also wasted. The key to ending world hunger is to reduce food waste. In fact, a new study by the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization found that limiting food waste globally could reduce the need to produce more food by 60 percent. The most wasted food are vegetables and cereals in industrialized Asia. There are many things people can do to reduce food loss and waste. Food retailers could reduce prices on misshapen vegetable and donate unsellable but edible food to those in need. Additionally, food not fit for human consumption can be reused to feed animals. Finally, individual consumers can buy only what they will eat, use better methods for storing and recycling food, and ask for smaller portions at restaurants. Thanks for bring up such an interesting topic!
    This is an article on the matter by Forbes that I found particularly interesting.
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/bethhoffman/2013/09/16/food-waste-a-key-to-ending-world-hunger/
  • Karina L-USA Karina L-USA Oct. 17, 2013
    *bringing up

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
LeeAnne W-Usa, Oct. 10, 2013

Many Americans eat way more than they should, especially when it comes to holiday dinners. One of the most famous holiday dinners is Thanksgiving. Most Americans consume about 4,500 calories on Thanksgiving Day. That is nearly 2,500 calories over the suggested intake! According to researchers at the University of Manchester in England, a Thanksgiving dinner for 8 produces about 44 POUNDS of carbon dioxide. About 60% of that number comes from just the life cycle of the turkey alone. Now I’m not saying that you can’t eat any turkey on Thanksgiving. Oh heavens no! That’s what Thanksgiving is all about. But you can make better choices in how you choose your turkey and other food. When choosing to buy food there are two types: organic and industrial agricultural. When choosing to buy organic food you are really helping the earth. About 14% of all greenhouse gases are related to industrial agricultural methods. When farmers use chemical fertilizers on plants it produces a lot of carbon. Even though this is supposed to be about carbon, you should know that over half of all methane (another major greenhouse gas) emissions are from concentrated animal feeding operations. Some of the ways buying organic food helps the environment are by reducing fossil fuel use, providing carbon sequestration in the soil, and eliminating the need for synthetic fertilizers and toxic pesticides. So when Thanksgiving rolls around, make sure to look for the organic turkey.

http://www.livestrong.com/article/327754-how-many-calories-does-the-average-american-eat-daily/
LeeAnne W-Usa
Comments (4)
  • Anton Ericsson Anton Ericsson Oct. 10, 2013
    My biggest dream in life is to be at a thanksgiving party. But that will never happen. And im really sad about that. #emo #imsosad #sadforlikes
  • Lina Eriksson Lina Eriksson Oct. 10, 2013
    Good for you Anton! I'm praying for you to be happy and to be at a thanksgiving party. xoxo
  • Anton Ericsson Anton Ericsson Oct. 10, 2013
    Thanks Lina you seems to be a good hairdresser! XOXO Gossip girl. :3
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Maryella C.USA, Oct. 9, 2013

Food is a huge contributor to your carbon footprint - producing about 8 tons of emissions in each household! changing your diet for the better can reduce this by a lot. This doesn’t mean you have to go vegetarian, but by changing your own eating habits you will save loads of money, improve your health, and your carbon footprint will drop. Meat, cheese, and eggs produce the most carbon. Eating differently can change the environment for the better and slow global warming. Read more about the certain amounts of greenhouse gases produced by different food sources in the link below.

http://www.greeneatz.com/foods-carbon-footprint.html
Maryella C.USA
Comments (1)
  • Jada L-Us Jada L-Us Feb. 26, 2014
    Hi im jada! i did not know how much food contributes to a person carbon footprint. Although i don't eat a lot of fast food my meat intake is very high and because of this it effected my carbon footprint. So i have slowed down my intake and hopefully that will make my carbon footprint drop.

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Abbey r-US, Oct. 9, 2013

Not only is meat a large contributor to carbon emissions, but individually packaged foods (granola bars) are as well. “Granola bars come in individual packaging, demanding high energy inputs and resulting in packaging waste. These products contribute up to a third of total energy inputs for food consumption, as their ingredients are shipped from all over, processed, packaged, trucked to storage” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_carbon_diet). Going on a low carbon diet is not only a healthy option- but its also great for our environment. If people in our country eliminated many of these foods in our diets, then we could change our carbon emissions significantly.

Abbey r-US
Comments (1)
  • Reynolds S-US Reynolds S-US Oct. 10, 2013
    Abbey, you are right. Meat IS a major contributor to carbon emissions. Because most meat is transported, carbon emissions are created due to the trucking. Eating organic food helps reduce carbon emissions because they do not need to be transported as far and therefore reduce the amount of carbon emissions created.

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Hannah T-USA, Oct. 9, 2013

Go vegetarian! I know this sounds daunting and almost impossible but going vegetarian even once a week can help not only your diet but the environment as well. It requires 2,500 gallons of water to produce one pound of beef! Transportation of this product also releases a lot of carbon into the atmosphere. So try and eat some veggies even if it is only for a day.

Hannah T-USA
Comments (2)
  • Elana S-USA Elana S-USA Oct. 10, 2013
    Hannah, I agree! Even though going vegetarian seems like and impossible ordeal, I have realized that if your give up meat products a little bit at a time, the task doesn't seem so difficult. This Science Times article outlines the harmfulness of meat, and shares some shocking statistics.

    http://science.time.com/2011/07/26/how-meat-and-dairy-are-hiking-your-carbon-footprint/

    Beef produces two times the carbon emissions of port, four times that of chicken, and 13 times the emissions of vegetable proteins such as lentils and beans!
  • Erika T-Sweden Erika T-Sweden Oct. 13, 2013
    That is some interesting facts you have there Elana! Combining the fact that beef produces 13 times the carbon emissions of vegetables with the fact that we need to lower our emissions if we want to save the planet from serious damage that could be caused from climate change really should be enough to make people stop eating beef! I just watched a swedish tv program where they concluded that we need to act fast to save our planet. Scientists now believe the goal of reducing carbon emissions by 2020 is unreachable. If the emissions keep getting higher after that it would mean higher tempratures leading to increasing waterlevels with cities buried under water and in many areas it would get impossible to live.

    I try to think about not eating to much meet, but I am bad at eat vegetarian. I think that is something i could get better at to reduce my carbon footprint.

    Maybe a vegetarian day in school could be a good idea to introduce the idea of vegetarian food to students?

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Natasha S, Oct. 8, 2013

I have NEVER been a vegetarian in my LIFE. I love meat. End of story. However, I was shocked to find that just because I am not a vegetarian, by CO2 emissions were automatically 7410lb. That is a HUGE amount of CO2 released! Of course, I think that the fact that I am an athlete contributes to the fact that I eat more because I burn more calories doing the sport I love. However, my overall CO2 emission for the FOOD category was significantly lower due to the fact that i eat a lot of fish, eggs, and dairy products. I do eat chicken, a bit of beef, and maybe some pork, but just having the other food groups in my diet besides Meat lowered my emissions by -447kg.
Now that I think about it though, I must say that it shouldn’t hurt to add a few vegetarian meals to diet every week. Not only would it lower my CO2 emissions, but it would be extremely healthy food, which is exactly what athletes, including me, need every week to keep up our energy. I was a bit confused on just exactly why eating meat raised the CO2 emissions so much until I realized that the meat in stores come from SOMEWHERE. There are farms out there that have to raise the cattle, butcher them, certify them as actually edible, and then transporting them to said store. This is probably just one of the many ways meat is such a huge contributor to our carbon footprints. However this does not mean that every single person on the planet needs to become a vegetarian or a vegan, though there’s nothing wrong with that, but it definitely would not hurt to cut down how many times we eat meat every week and replace it instead, with vegetables.

Natasha S
Comments (2)
  • Kelsey D - USA Kelsey D - USA Oct. 9, 2013
    Hi Natasha! My name is Kelsey and I'm an athlete too. I have to eat a lot of food to have enough energy. I run cross country and when I started training with my team I started eating almost twice as much food as I was before; I was always hungry! I was really surprised how this affected my carbon footprint. I didn't know my footprint could increase just because the meats I ate had to be transported to my grocery store. Meats with a lot of protein are really good for us to eat, but I completely agree with you that we could cut down a little bit and eat more vegetables.
  • Hannah T-USA Hannah T-USA Oct. 9, 2013
    Going vegetarian can be super hard! However if you have just one vegetarian day a week, we can save water, trees, and less carbon will be emitted due to the fact that there will be no need for transportation. I am challenging myself to try and have one vegetarian day a week now!

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Betsy f-usa, Oct. 7, 2013

One action that can greatly reduce your carbon footprint is obtaining food from local sources, such as shopping at the farmers market or getting fruits and vegetables from a neighbor who grows them. Also, fishing and hunting to obtain meat would reduce your carbon footprint. When you hunt or fish to obtain your own meat, the process which gets the meat from the animal to your plate is much more direct and simple. In an article in “The Scientific American”, Nathan Fiala states that “…current production levels of meat contribute between 14 and 22 percent of the 36 billion tons of “CO2-equivalent” greenhouse gases the world produces every year.” This is specifically about the beef industry in the United States. However, if you obtain your own meat straight from nature, it goes through much less processing, reducing the amount of carbon released into the atmosphere.

Betsy f-usa
Comments (1)
  • Julia C-US Julia C-US Oct. 8, 2013
    I agree with this. My uncles are all hunters and do not buy store bought meat. They also grow their own vegetables. By looking at the amount of carbon released from buying inorganic products, and meat they must be helping the environment substantially. Through research I discovered that 13,000 kg. of Carbon is released from every kilogram of beef killed, and processed. This is a large amount of Carbon for just meat. I do agree that eating simply, and growing and killing your own food is a very good plan to reduce a persons carbon footprint.

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Kelsey D - USA, Oct. 7, 2013

From what I have learned in class so far, eating proteins such as eggs, chicken, and pork increases our carbon emission because of the transportation it takes to get the meat to the grocery store. After some research, I learned that including frozen foods, such as ice cream, can also reduce your carbon footprint according to this article:http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/06/business/worldbusiness/06iht-greencol07.4.6029437.html?_r=0 Eating cold foods lowers our body temperature, so we won’t use as much air conditioning in our home. I thought this was interesting. I don’t think this means we should all include a ton of ice cream in our diet, but maybe cold/frozen drinks can have the same effect.

Kelsey D - USA
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Kelly H-USA, Oct. 7, 2013

Even though almost a billion people on the Earth don’t have enough food to eat according to the FAO, we still grow food to feed 10 billion people says the Huffington Post (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/eric-holt-gimenez/world-hunger_b_1463429.html). The problem is that we can’t distribute this food to the people who need it. This leads to all that excess fruit being wasted, which doesn’t help carbon output. If we could find a way to quickly and non-wastefully ship this food, we could more easily solve the problem of world hunger. What could be some easy ways to transport food around the world?

Kelly H-USA
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Julia Götborg, Oct. 7, 2013

Hey guys! My name is Julia and I live in Gothenburg, the second largest city in Sweden. From what I can tell in this discussion as well as in prior research (http://www.unep.org/wed/quickfacts/), the waste of food in rich countries are considered a main reason for the negative impact on the climate. I have come across a simple tip that we all can use in order to decrease our waste!

In Sweden the food in the stores are marked with something called “Bäst fore datum” which translates to “Freshness date” in English. Do you have these in your countries too? Of course these markings are practical in order for people not to eat bad or rotten food, however studies show that these dates are set way too early. This Swedish study (http://www.konsumentforeningenstockholm.se/Pressrum/Pressmeddelanden/Cision-flode1/Ny-studie-visar-att-agg-haller-minst-en-manad-efter-bast-fore-datum/) shows that eggs may last up to 1 month after the “freshness date” has expired! The food companies are bound by law not to put anything bad in the market, otherwise they can be sued, which leads to them marking the food with dates that allows a room for error, not correctly according to ability to eat. This study from a Swedish university proves this correct; http://stud.epsilon.slu.se/4665/1/jonsson_c_120814.pdf.pdf.

So, my tip for all of you! Do not trust the marks blindly, use your eyes, ears and taste buds to determine if the food is eatable or not. By this you will save both money and helping the environment!

Julia Götborg
Comments (3)
  • Lauren M-USA Lauren M-USA Oct. 7, 2013
    I think you've brought up a very interesting topic! I live in Texas in the United States, and we have something very similar to your freshness dates, though they're usually “sell by” or “use by” labels. I found an article similar to yours detailing the amount of food wasted in the US because of these misleading dates; the numbers are incredibly daunting! http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/Masses-of-food-wasted-use-by-dates-mislead-4825974.php
    I never even thought about the dates being wrong, but I'll definitely be more careful about what I throw out! Thanks!
  • Sophy C-USA Sophy C-USA Oct. 7, 2013
    I agree. I'm from California, USA, but my parents are from China. They do not like to waste anything. Usually food is still good a week or two after the date marked. I'm fine with it when it comes to milk and eggs, but sometimes my family can get a little crazy. My grandma cooked me spoiled steak once saying “Oh we put it in the freezer. Its fine” and I find out it was months old. I almost threw up.

    If people are throwing things away the moment they reach the date marked on the food, that is incredibly wasteful
  • Katie Emery Katie Emery Oct. 14, 2013
    Hi Julia, my name is Katie from America. I agree with what you said about the freshness date, making people more inclined to throw away perfectly fine food. The food can usually last a week or more past the date printed on the product; however some people get scared by the fact that the food may be bad, and they will throw it away. You had a good idea with your tip! By using our senses we can determine if the food is good or not, rather than depending on the date printed. By doing this it will cut down on the amount of good food being thrown away and wasted.

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