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Posts tagged "food" - Page 2

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Discussions Discussion Health & Environment
Rebecca P, Feb. 27, 2014

I believe that our health and the environment are definitely related to each other. For instance, if we eat more vegetables, fruits, and things that don’t have to be processed and made into other things in factories, then we will be more healthy and there will be less factories and such. When there are less factories the environment will be better off because the air isn’t being polluted as much, plus there would be more room to grow fruits and vegetables.
In other aspects if we are healthier and we feel better then we are more likely to go out and exercise rather than being inside. While we are outside we might pick up trash and things which will keep the environment in a better state.

Rebecca P
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Maddi Ownbey, Feb. 27, 2014

When I calculated my Carbon footprint mine was a good bit lower than our nations average. Living in the United States makes my footprint as a whole a lot bigger than the countries in the rest of the world. To be honest, people who live here, including myself, are so wasteful and inconsiderate. I learned that I need to carpool more for sure. There is no way possible for me to walk or even ride my bike to school. I just live too far away. It’s about a 20 minute drive to school, church, the grocery store, I would be walking or riding my bike literally all day. My diet is actually a lot lower than the average just because I only eat 1 or 2 meals a day. I snack some but not too much. My family recycles and burns as much trash as we can, though we still use about 3 or 4 bags of trash a week. But there is also four people that live in my house. Is there anything I can do to decrease my footprint?

Maddi Ownbey
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Caitlin Bond, Feb. 27, 2014

My name is Caitlin Bond and I live in South Carolina. After calculating my carbon footprint, I was surprised to see the difference choices in diet can affect the carbon footprint one carries. I did not know that it made any difference on your environmental mark and I was surprised to see that mine was actually pretty high, probably because of the amount of to-go orders I take with me since I don’t usually have time to sit down and have a meal. I’m looking to eat more meals at home and eat fruits and vegetables more often since they are organic in order to lower my carbon footprint.

Caitlin Bond
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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Natalia W-US, Feb. 26, 2014

My mother and I like to grow our own vegetables and herbs during the summer time. We try our best in the wintertime but we don’t have a place in a window to put them for the plants to grow. We like the fresh taste, and it’s so cool to see how well you did growing your own! As for our backyard, we would grow a lot more than we do now but we don’t have that land to grow it on.

Natalia W-US
Comments (2)
  • kevin prince boateng kevin prince boateng Feb. 27, 2014
    me too i have got a garden where i grow vegetebles and fruits like onion,garlic,courgettes,tomatoes,salad,potatos and some fruits. i like coltivate because is more healty and cheap. :)
  • Annie D-US Annie D-US Feb. 27, 2014
    This is such an awesome and healthy way to get your own food! It’s also super good for the environment. When I get older I want to keep a garden and grow everything fresh because I know it’ll save me money as well. Land is definitely the key to start growing but sometimes they have community gardens around areas.

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Discussions Discussion Health & Environment
Mary M, Feb. 26, 2014

In such a technological and polluted world our health really be defined by the environment in which we live. If someone lives in a low class area, they are most likely in a place where waste is not properly disposed of and sanitation and clean food in water is easily accessible. As a result, their health will falter. Diseases, such as tapeworm and E. coli, are easily transmitted through polluted water and undercooked or rotten food. Although this person cannot help their situation their environment determines their health. In contrast, a person who lives in a wealthier town and has access to clean food and water is apt to be healthier because their risk of disease is lower. Another reason why those who live in better environments are at a greater chance of being healthy is because they have more access and a greater understanding of exercise. They are more likely to have access to safe trails and sidewalks and have more time to be active, whereas someone in an unsafe neighborhood who needs to work to help their family, would not have this amenity.

Mary M
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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Andrea C-US, Feb. 23, 2014

When I got my carbon footprints back I was shocked to discover that the majority of my CO2 emissions came from food. Four meals out of my seven meals consist of meat; so to discover that meat is a large sum of the CO2 that I personally produce shocked me. I have also just found out that most meat will now give me acid reflux. In a strange way having acid reflux has made me cut down the consumption of meat I eat. I am not saying everyone should get acid reflux, but I am saying that is possible to eat less meat in order to cut down our CO2 emissions. In my hometown, we do not have a local garden, but our class is working to make one at the High School. I believe that our community would use the local garden, which would in turn help our environment. The only problem with the garden is the size, if it were to feed just half of our community the garden would have to be double the size that it is now.

Andrea C-US
Comments (1)
  • Emily R-US Emily R-US Feb. 25, 2014
    I completely agree with you Andrea that the town we live in, Clover SC, would greatly benefit from having more local food options. We have a few produce stands scattered here and there, but there is no established market for locally grown food. This poses a huge problem for people trying to reduce their carbon footprint by changing food habits. I feel that it is almost unrealistic to live completely off of a home garden and the few fresh food stands available. If a real difference is to be seen, and initiative will have to be made by towns as a whole. Farmers markets can help reduces wasted energy in transporting produce as well as eliminate foods made in factories with unnecessary additives! I think steps should be made to making the grocery store only an option and not the required.

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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Hildur Róbertsdóttir, Feb. 12, 2014

Eating locally produced food does help the climate problem because you aren´t eating processed food that has a lot of unnecessary substances. The other potential environmental and social benefits of eating locally-grown food is that they are most of the time healthier than processed food. In my school we don´t have a food garden and also not in my home. Yes I most surdently want one… :)

Hildur Róbertsdóttir
Comments (1)
  • jared momberger jared momberger Feb. 28, 2014
    My name is Jared. I work on a large scale produce farm and we are pretty local and we sell to the public around town. I see people everyday at my job coming and making good choices for there family to eat locally grown food. I do think that if you can, then you should grow your own food at home and also be proud of it. But in my case, if everyone grew their own food i would be out of the job. I do think that home grown food is great, but the farm i work at is local and also grows their food very safe. And all the food is harvested by hand. Many who can grow their own food should but i still think you should support local farmers around.

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Discussions Discussion Carbon Footprint and Economic Crisis
Kate M, Feb. 10, 2014

From my understanding of economics, there seems to be a complex relationship between affluence and carbon emissions. Generally speaking, those with more money can afford certain luxuries, perhaps above all air travel, greatly contributing to their carbon footprint. At the same time, however, those in the upper-middle and upper classes have certain opportunities to reduce their emissions in ways that those living close to or below the poverty line do not. Those who lack economic security are often forced to eat foods that contribute the most emissions because fast food is dominated by meat products and organic food products are generally too expensive. At the same time, however, those living in extreme poverty in more rural areas, especially agricultural communities, have some of the lowest footprints because meat production without subsidies and economies of scale is really expensive. Those in the upper class can also afford to install green appliances and buy more expensive cars with higher fuel efficiency.

Kate M
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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Ngozi N- USA, Oct. 25, 2013

Unfortunately, due to our current living arrangements, my family can’t have an actual garden. We can plant things and what not, but we just don’t have the space that is required to maintain a healthy garden. However, gardens are not anything new or foreign to my family.

In my family, there is a long background of gardens and home grown foods. For my parents, they grew up eating vegetables and fresh foods right from their backyard. Not everything, such as their rice, was home grown, but for the most part things were straight from their backyard. It was nothing special; it is the common way of things in their part of Nigeria. They knew that not everyone had a “garden” (they didn’t think of it as a garden, more so just their main source of food) and actually took pride in having one. They knew the importance of it and didn’t see the value in going out to dine at a place where they didn’t know what was actually in the food (that was really the main concern).

So for both of my parents, their families, and all that were before them, they realized the importance of having a garden way before they knew what a carbon footprint even was. A website I found actually goes in to detail about most of the benefits that my family found in growing their food right from home. The website focuses on the improvement of Australia, and that’s obviously not why my family grew their own food, but the ideas are generally the same. The link is below.

http://www.veryediblegardens.com/iveg/why-grow-food
Ngozi N- USA
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Discussions Discussion Home grown
sydney nUSA, Oct. 23, 2013

After calculating my carbon foot print, part of my carbon food print I use is from eating! I love eating meat, but I HATE eating vegetables. I really don’t like eating vegetables and eating a lot of meat has an impact on carbon footprint. I want to reduce my carbon footprint as much as a can! I think that eating less meat would help reduce my carbon footprint. I could also start eating more vegetable meals instead of eating meat for every meal! Also I want to eat more whole foods instead of foods that are preserved.

sydney nUSA
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