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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Ally E- USA, Oct. 9, 2013

Receiving my carbon footprint was a big shock. I did not expect it to be so high compared to the average carbon footprint of my city. Many people in my community had a similar shock when they received their carbon footprint. When I thought about every one’s carbon footprint put together, I realized how much we need to make a change, especially living in a large city. If I were mayor of my city I would help make a change. I would increase public transit. I would build more metros, and add more buses. I would encourage people to bike and walk to work or school, and donate bicycles to those who can afford public transit. I’d also encourage people to recycle and increase the recycle pickups to 2 or 3 times a week depending of the area. I would open daily farmer markets in the city to encourage people to buy organic, biodegradable produce. Being mayor can be a difficult job, especially in a major city. I believe if they push going green, and take these actions to reduce the cities carbon footprint it would make the city a better, cleaner and more prosperous place. I think with these changes it would also make the mayors job a lot easier.

Ally E- USA
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Mary W- USA, Oct. 8, 2013

After receiving my results from my carbon footprint test, I found the amount of carbon used on transportation was a very high. Although U.S. power plants were the main source of greenhouse gases release 2.4 billion metric tons, vehicles are the second largest source with 1.2 billion metric tons of greenhouse gases being released. Carbon dioxide is one of the main greenhouse gases. According to my research, California, some other western states, and Vermont are all now using labels ranking cars based on their amount of their greenhouse gases released. Many states are trying to find ways to reduce this amount. I think Texas should join in on using the labels on cars. Another way to reduce your carbon footprint is by carpooling. Just carpooling with one other person can cut the amount of carbon dioxide released from your vehicle almost in half. Carpooling has other pluses such as saving money on gas as well as saving time on driving. A special carpooling lane is offered in many states to cars with more than 2 people occupying them. Carpooling should be promoted in every state. Ever since I have started carpooling, life has been easier for myself and my mom.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=carbon-dioxide-from-cars-09-01-08
Mary W- USA
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Mary W- USA, Oct. 8, 2013

After receiving my results from my carbon footprint test, I found the amount of carbon used on transportation was a very high. Although U.S. power plants were the main source of greenhouse gases release 2.4 billion metric tons, vehicles are the second largest source with 1.2 billion metric tons of greenhouse gases being released. Carbon dioxide is one of the main greenhouse gases. According to my research, California, some other western states, and Vermont are all now using labels ranking cars based on their amount of their greenhouse gases released. Many states are trying to find ways to reduce this amount. I think Texas should join in on using the labels on cars. Another way to reduce your carbon footprint is by carpooling. Just carpooling with one other person can cut the amount of carbon dioxide released from your vehicle almost in half. Carpooling has other pluses such as saving money on gas as well as saving time on driving. A special carpooling lane is offered in many states to cars with more than 2 people occupying them. Carpooling should be promoted in every state. Ever since I have started carpooling, life has been easier for myself and my mom.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=carbon-dioxide-from-cars-09-01-08
Mary W- USA
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Mary W- USA, Oct. 8, 2013

After receiving my results from my carbon footprint test, I found the amount of carbon used on transportation was a very high. Although U.S. power plants were the main source of greenhouse gases release 2.4 billion metric tons, vehicles are the second largest source with 1.2 billion metric tons of greenhouse gases being released. Carbon dioxide is one of the main greenhouse gases. According to my research, California, some other western states, and Vermont are all now using labels ranking cars based on their amount of their greenhouse gases released. Many states are trying to find ways to reduce this amount. I think Texas should join in on using the labels on cars. Another way to reduce your carbon footprint is by carpooling. Just carpooling with one other person can cut the amount of carbon dioxide released from your vehicle almost in half. Carpooling has other pluses such as saving money on gas as well as saving time on driving. A special carpooling lane is offered in many states to cars with more than 2 people occupying them. Carpooling should be promoted in every state. Ever since I have started carpooling, life has been easier for myself and my mom.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=carbon-dioxide-from-cars-09-01-08
Mary W- USA
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Ryan P-USA, Oct. 1, 2013

Hello everyone, my name is Ryan and I live in Oakland, California in the United States.

I am very interested in ways to reduce carbon emissions and increase sustainability in cities and towns, especially by means of finding renewable energy sources. If I were a city planner focused on sustainability, I would devote my attention towards clean transportation fuels and green generation of electricity. I believe these are the main sources of the high greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere. Additionally, if we could find better methods to create electricity without burning fossil fuels and to travel to places without gasoline or aviation fuel, we would be heading the right direction towards a sustainable and clean future. However, if we continue to consume these materials, we will not only deplete Earth’s resources, but also pollute the planet tremendously. Thus, it is better to find alternatives now before we are desperately scraping the Earth for resources or struggling to clean the air.

Recently, I have had a growing interest in biofuels, and I happened upon this article regarding the production of biofuel by feeding sugar to E. coli bacteria. At the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), some chemical engineers figured out how to modify glycolysis, a process some organisms undergo to convert sugar into molecules the cells need. The researchers’ method of creating this biofuel emits no carbon dioxide, which is less than the two carbon dioxide molecules current biorefineries emit every time glycolysis occurs. When considering the millions of cells emitting two carbon dioxide molecules, it becomes obvious how much cleaner and more economical this customized glycolysis procedure is. This production of biofuel is completely efficient because no carbon dioxide is lost, but is instead conserved and used in the process of converting organic material into fuel. This is a quintessential example of how we are striving towards a sustainable future by advancing existing fuel technologies rather than simply conserving resources (though that is also good). The efficiency improvements also show how much closer we are to getting to long-lasting, proficient energy sources. Though we may be a long ways away from everlasting energy, finding methods to increase efficiency in biofuels is a great start, and the fact that they are clean is great, too!

A city with this biofuel (or other efficient fuels) would be clean and sustainable. I would want to live in an area where the pollution is not hovering above me in a musky, suffocating cloud and where I am conscious that future generations can continue to enjoy the Earth that we have today. However, this article brings up an interesting question: clean fuels can only be so efficient to a certain extent. When that point is reached, what will we turn to? Solar panels? Or will we continue consuming, just at a slower rate?

http://www.rdmag.com/news/2013/10/new-metabolic-pathway-more-efficiently-converts-sugars-biofuels
Ryan P-USA
Comments (7)
  • JohnRobert W-USA JohnRobert W-USA Oct. 3, 2013
    Would this bio-fuel idea apply to airplanes? My footprint was above average only because of our plane flights. If this idea applied to airplanes, how big would the impact be? Theoretically?
  • Jason Hodin Jason Hodin Oct. 3, 2013
    Airplanes are a real problem. You have to get a super heavy thing to move against gravity and get airborne. This means that the fuel has to burn EXTREMELY hot. Yes, there is research into so-called “second generation biofuels” that cn reduce airline emissions by like 50% or more per passenger over petrooleum based jet fuel.

    Qantas has a good web site that talks about what other factors are being discussed and researched related to increasing efficiency. This includes things that you can do when planning a flight:

    http://www.qantas.com.au/travel/airlines/fuel/global/en
  • adrian a-usa adrian a-usa Oct. 3, 2013
    we should have this type of bio fuel with also functioning solar panels and self charging battery on the car, so while the car runs, it charges
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
matteo rodondi, May 29, 2013

hi guys my name is matteo and i live in italy.
We have enough food to feed everyone in the world. World hunger is a problem that doesn’t need to exist. This is a much bigger immediate problem than one’s carbon footprint. but it’s possible remove the hunger from the world? have any ideas?

matteo rodondi
Comments (2)
  • Lauren M-USA Lauren M-USA Oct. 8, 2013
    I agree that world hunger is a huge issue throughout the world. So far, I don't think anyone has really come up with any long-lasting solution to hunger, either. Of course, there is the idea of increasing food production, but then there is the issue of distribution, growing space, etc. I did find a rather interesting article, however, that talks about how hunger is directly related to poverty, and in order to solve world hunger, we have to first look at solving poverty. I think this is pretty accurate; if we were able to lift people out of poverty, they would eventually have the means to provide their own food and world hunger would decrease. It isn't a flawless idea by any means, but it's definitely interesting in its own right.

    http://www.globalissues.org/article/8/solving-world-hunger-means-solving-world-poverty
  • Paige Savard Paige Savard Oct. 14, 2013
    I agree with both of your statements. There is definitely a direct relationship between poverty and world hunger. The less money one tends to have, the less food they will be able to consume because they simply cannot afford it. In order to help the hungry there must be a dramatic change in the distribution of wealth that is still a problem to this day. There also tends to be a direct relationship with wealth and one's carbon footprint. The wealthier someone tends to be, the more resources they have financial access to and will be able to afford cars, new technology, large houses and much more that all burns a supplement amount of carbon. It is just a matter of starting the process in helping the hungry, and even though there are great efforts to help, there could definitely be a better attempt or greater actions to help the ones in need.

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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
matteo rodondi, May 29, 2013

hi guys i’m matteo and i live in italy!
I recycle my trash and I think it is a necessary job for every citizen. But many people in their daily life don’t have time to wash glass or plastic bottles and remove their labels off or they are to lazy to put glass, paper and plastic into different bags or just to find recycling containers outside. this attitude has to be changed if we want to have our earth clean.

matteo rodondi
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Alessandro C, May 29, 2013

Hi guys!
I live in a small village in the mountains in the north of Italy named Edolo. Here we use hydroelectric energy and for heat my house I use a lot of diesel oil. I use to heating my house for six month per year because from October to march the temperatures are really cold. I’d like to install many solar panels in my house for reduce pollution. My village isn’t big and there aren’t any factories so the pollution isn’t very high. I think the pollution in the big cities is an important problem that can be resolved with some little sacrifices from people that live in these cities.

Alessandro C
Comments (1)
  • Lauren M-USA Lauren M-USA Oct. 8, 2013
    I definitely agree with you about how pollution from big cities is becoming a major issue. I live in Texas and I know that Houston and Dallas both release huge amounts of carbon into the air each year, and that's definitely something we should look at finding solutions to; the solar panels are a really creative idea! I also find it interesting that you are used to colder temperatures. In Texas, we actually rely on air-conditioning about 9 months of the year, and I wish that ould somehow be reduced as well.

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domenico pedrotti, May 19, 2013

HI everyone
I live in Malonno, the small town in the mountain valley called Vallecamonica. Where I live the pollution is not as bad as in big cities because we have many forests. Here,the most serious form of pollution is represented by visual pollution due to the presence of overhead power lines . I think the solution to visual pollution could be the use of power lines underground.
I’d like know what do you think about this problem.

domenico pedrotti
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
domenico pedrotti, May 19, 2013

HI!
My name is Domenico Pedrotti, i’m 16 years old. I am a student at IIS Meneghini to the secondary school in Edolo, a small mountain village in the north of Italy. My total carbon footprint is 7642Kg CO2 per year, in the Italy the average footprint is 8181 Kg. I always go to school by car with my mum because she works in the hospital near the school while I go back home by bus.
My results are:
Transport: 1120
Home: 3850
Food: 2461
Purchase: 211

domenico pedrotti
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