Loading...

To post, comment, or enjoy any of the other features of Einztein, please register.
Already registered? Then log in!

Posts tagged "food" - Page 12

Filter By
  • My Posts
  • Learned Posts
  • My Discussions
  • Joined Discussions
  • Favorite Members
  • Curated Posts
Join Now
Discussions Discussion Home grown
Kylie S-USA, Nov. 15, 2012

Hi! My name is Kylie. My family owns a ranch and we have a house in Houston. At our ranch and in our tiny backyard in Houston, we have huge gardens and fruit trees. I know that growing your own food can be good for the environment, plus it is also healthier, and it’s a really fun activity to do with your family/friends. By growing your own produce you are declining the manufactured and genetically engineered products which can increase the amount of carbon. Plants take carbon dioxide from the environment and give back oxygen Another good point is if you home grow something you don’t have to use pesticides and all the other artificial substances that are put into producing these (sometimes) “genetically altered” fruits and vegetables. Therefore, I am just advising that that growing your own produce is a healthier, greener, and fun choice. Also, growing your own produce is significantly cheaper than buying produce from stores. My mother and I do most of the gardening. We grow a variety of fruits and vegetables both here in Houston and at my ranch. However, depending on the season we grow different types of fruits and vegetables. We have grown strawberries, oranges, lemons, pears, peaches, black berries, raspberries, tomatoes, squash, watermelons, cantaloupe, green beans, zucchini, lettuce, bell peppers, cabbage, basil, jalapeños, rosemary, radishes, carrots, and cucumber. Everything homegrown (in my opinion) is fresher, more natural, and just more delicious than store bought food. My family is always visiting our garden happy to see what is growing and then we make wonderful dishes or snacks with our produce!

Kylie S-USA
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Home grown
Lindsey M-USA, Nov. 15, 2012

Home grown food is really good. My neighbors grow a lot food in their backyard, and they use it to cook their food. Recently my mom bought several fruit trees, and I can’t wait until they grow enough so that we can have fresh fruit in the summer. There are so many benefits to homegrown food. Here is an article all about it.

http://www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_articles.asp?id=1275
Lindsey M-USA
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Daphne K-USA, Nov. 15, 2012

Hi, my name is Daphne. I have always had enough of everything, like food. But I have a very small appetite. I tend to not finish my food a lot, but I always feel bad. If it’s at a restaurant, I take it home. If it’s at home, I eat it another day. However at school and camp, its harder to have a solution. It bothers me to throw away food, even though it is inevitable. Another thing I tend to do is say that I’m “dying of hunger”. When I say this, I don’t realize how insensitive this is. People in the world are actually dying of hunger. Things you can do locally are easy. Volunteer at a homeless shelter, donate canned goods, etc. Last year, at my old school, on several occasions, I went with friends to a local church which serves homeless people with 3 meals a day, help to get jobs, and other support. We served breakfast to about 75 homeless people. This is a great way to help out.

Daphne K-USA
Comments (2)
  • Lauren L-USA Lauren L-USA Nov. 15, 2012
    Hi Daphne - I agree with you! I have been in similar situations as you and I always feel horrible when I throw away food that I am too full to eat. Here is a helpful link that shows you 12 different ways that you can help reduce the amount of food that is wasted. While most of the things listed may be more geared towards parents (like organizing the fridge, etc.) I found that tip number four was the most helpful to me.

    http://www.wholeliving.com/136597/12-ways-prevent-food-waste-home/@center/136755/green-home-guide
  • Daphne K-USA Daphne K-USA Nov. 15, 2012
    Thanks Lauren! This is really helpful and I will show my parents this as well.

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Caroline R-US, Nov. 15, 2012

Hi. My name is Caroline and I am a freshman at a high school in Texas. Through calculating my carbon footprint, I learned that what food and how much food people consume can have a huge impact on the amount of carbon emitted. Eating and buying a lot of food is not good. It takes a lot of gas and energy to transport food across the United States or even around the world. According to the CEE, 9% of America’s energy consumption comes from transporting and processing foods. This a pretty large percentage, considering how many other things in the world emit carbon or use energy. Also considering the fact that America is the fattest country, this fact may not be surprising. Whether or not you think it is surprising, we can try to help out our country to reduce this percentage. There are fast food restaurants on almost every corner. All we have to do is simply not eat there and instead make dinner at home. Also, when buying food at the grocery store try not to buy food with a lot of packaging. Buy more natural food or locally grown food. We can help our country, but only if everyone contributes!

http://www.ceeonline.org/greenGuide/food/upload/environmenthealth.aspx
Caroline R-US
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
grace l, Nov. 15, 2012

Hi my name is Grace and I am from the United States. After studying it during class, I learned that our diets are a part of our carbon footprints.

Especially in America, being it is considered the fattest country, there is a fast food restaurant on every corner. Many american actually eat multiple times a week believe it or not! They package most of there food in plastic or paper and most restaurants don’t even have recycle bins! We also waste a lot of food because A. restaraunts give us too much food, or B. we dont eat all of it. This causes the trash to fill up faster, meaning more waste put into the earth.

Eating a lot of meat also affects the carbon footprint suprisingly. For every hamburger that is made, 55 square feet of rainforest are cut down. At that rate, just imagine how many rainforests are cut down each year!! 150 pounds of carbon are produced for every hamburger too! It is better to eat more organic foods because they produce oxygen and they make there own food! Plus, it’s much healthier for you

http://www.ceeonline.org/greenGuide/food/upload/environmenthealth.aspx
grace l
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Isabella R-Usa, Nov. 15, 2012

Many of the carbon emissions resulting from foods are actually from the transportation of it. Whether by trucks or planes, the long distances traveled in order to get food on the shelves of our supermarkets add even more carbon emissions to our atmosphere. Different countries import food from places that are farther away; for example. New Zealand imports kiwis year round from Italy. England imports 20 tons of water bottles from Australia. Since there is no taxing on shipping such large freights by air or sea and such transport is cheap, countries continue to ship large quantities of food over long distances without paying much attention to the pollution. A simple way to make a difference is buying local, organically grown food from a farmer’s market. The food will be fresher since it did not have to travel hundreds of kilometers just to get to your plate. In addition, you have the option to buy a much greater variety of healthier and seasonal fruits and vegetables.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/26/business/worldbusiness/26food.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
Isabella R-Usa
Comments (1)
  • Jason Hodin Jason Hodin Nov. 16, 2012
    Hi Isabella— transport distance is definitely an issue, but as described in the book “How Bad are Bananas?”, transport distance is generally a small portion of the total food footprint. Most of the footprint comes from production and processing. Son the answer to the title of that book is— not very bad. Bananas are shipped on slow freight by sea, so the “emissions per banana” are pretty low. By contrast, if a fruit is shipped on an airplane, then the emissions per item go up tremendously. So more perishable fruit like berries shipped by plane would be a high transport footprint. Also, flowers in wintertime shipped from across the globe is a huge footprint!

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Julia R-USA, Nov. 15, 2012

I learned, surprisingly, that your diet plays a role in your carbon footprint, and many people don’t know this.

I think one of the main problems we have is that we waste so much food. Restaurants everyday throw away all the food that people don’t eat, and that trash alone could feed thousands of hungry people. There is also the point of becoming a vegetarian. While that lifestyle has been proven to be healthier in many ways, this is not always a feasible option for many people. I tried to become vegetarian for a year, but had to stop after the fourth month, because my mom was worried that during my sports seasons, I would not be getting adequate nutrition. I am allergic to nuts and soy, so becoming a vegetarian would be very difficult for me to be as healthy as possible, especially if fish and things were off the table.

If people order the food they know they will eat, and not super-size their meals, a LOT of food will be saved. Many people also invite the less fortunate for Thanksgiving, or deliver a meal to them. This too can feed the hungry. Lastly, if people planned out their meals for the week, and only bought at the grocery store what they NEEDED, not thought they needed, I can’t even begin to imagine the amount of food that would be saved just from my house alone.

Here’s a link about how to plan your meals weekly, which is also a way to reduce stress. Check it out!

http://lifehacker.com/5896745/plan-your-weekly-meals-stress-free
Julia R-USA
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Julia T-USA, Nov. 15, 2012

When using the footprint calculator I realized that my emissions from food were lower than expected. I think that world hunger is a huge problem. People should only buy the food that they will eat. I feel that it is really wasteful to buy food and let it go bad in your refridgerator. According to the New York Times the problem of world hunger is starting to flare up again. African is one of the main countries that struggle with hunger. One of the main problems for Africa is that fertilizer is too expensive. I think that world hunger needs to be more of a priority. I have donated to a local food bank and little things like that can help. Anything that you do even if it is in your city is helping a few people. We need to start small and then expand more and more.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/16/business/world-hunger-the-problem-left-behind-economic-view.html?_r=0
Julia T-USA
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Emma H-USA, Nov. 11, 2012

The livestock industry has a big impact on the state of the enviroment right now. Meat-eating is causing destruction of natural habitats. Many trees are being cut down to give cattle fields to graze in. If the world did not demand the amount of meat that it does the state of the enviroment would be much better. The link below says, about “25% of the planet’s land surface is used for the grazing of domestic livestock.” That is one fourth of all land! If cattle were not on this land it would have trees on it and those trees would be producing oxygen and taking in the huge amounts of carbon dioxide being produced by the rest of the world.

http://www.lettuceleaf.org/help_the_environment/
Emma H-USA
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Ana B-USA, Nov. 11, 2012

In order to minimize the amount of food wasted in the world, I believe that people should buy and provide only the food that they need. The UN states that an estimated billion tons of valuable food goes to waste every year. Much food is wasted every year due to excess food rotting after being discarded or simply not being purchased to be later discarded as well. A large amount of food is wasted due to the overstocking of supermarket shelves and an overproduction of food. There is such an abundance of this food that there is more supply than demand for it. Instead of being used to feed the poor and help those in need, this food is usually thrown out or discarded. Even the food that is sold goes to waste. Many people throw away tons of perfectly edible uneaten food into the trash every day. Much of this waste is caused by people in first-world countries like the U.S., the UN, along with many others. The amount of food wasted in the U.S. alone could be used to feed over 25 million people! If we can find a way to avoid the wasting of this one billion tons of food and utilize it to feed the poor, I believe a great step towards solving world hunger could be taken.

Links to News Articles and Sources:
http://money.cnn.com/2011/05/11/news/economy/world_squanders_food/index.htm
http://www.businessinsider.com/americans-waste-165-billion-in-food-per-year-ndrc-2012-8

Ana B-USA
Comments (1)
  • Jana H-USA Jana H-USA Nov. 15, 2012
    I totally agree with you! Many people obtain so much food that they cannot eat it all, and it goes to waste. Many sit-down restaurants do not help with this. In a sit-down restaurant, a person orders a food they like, and most of the time, the portion size is out of their control. More often than not, the portions the customers receive are larger than what they can eat. I believe we can stop this by having the chefs prepare smaller meals. This can decrease the amount of food being wasted.

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Are you sure?