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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Logan C-US, Feb. 28, 2014

If I were to create a city whose goal is to have low carbon transportation, things would be a lot different from where I live. Not having big diesel trucks and such would be the first thing to eliminate and then start to emphasis on walking or riding bikes to certain places. My city wouldn’t have as many roads but would instead have trails and bike lanes. Even though it would be better for the environment, to me personally I would not like to live there.

Logan C-US
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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Macey K-US, Feb. 21, 2014

Eating locally produced food does help with the climate problem because even if the food comes from local farmers markets or produce stands it cuts down on the fuel emissions it cost to transport on large scale foods that effects global warming immensely.

Macey K-US
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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Sophie J-USA, Oct. 21, 2013

Hi, I’m Sophie from California, U.S. I was really surprised to find out that most of my footprint was involved with my traveling. I’ve traveled a lot in the past year through airplane, car, bike, walking, and found it interesting to see how much bigger it makes my footprint (it made up most of it.)
I wasn’t aware it produces so much carbon. Also, it’s incredible how much higher the U.S. footprints are than other countries. It’s weird to think I live in the country that uses the most energy and produces the most carbon in the world. The average American footprint can double, triple, or quadruple in size of the average world footprint. To help the environment, I will travel less by car, and walk to more places than I used to.

Most of the other sections were around average for me and my family, gladly. I will make changes to help produce less carbon and to save the environment.

Sophie J-USA
Comments (10)
  • Giulia O. Italy Giulia O. Italy Oct. 25, 2013
    Hi Sophie, I’m Giulia and I’m from Italy. My carbon footprint is quite high at home and transport categories because I live in the mountains and I use wood 5 months a year; I take a bus 5 times a week to get to school. I usually go to the supermarket on foot with my grandmother because I like walking. What can I do for transport and home categories?
  • Stephanie Leighton Stephanie Leighton Oct. 26, 2013
    Hi Giulia, my name is Stephanie and I live in California. We are doing a project for biology about carbon footprints so I'm currently learning new ways to reduce carbon emissions and can answer your question regarding the transportation and home categories.
    If you haven't already you can switch your light bulbs to the energy-efficient fluorescent kind. Also, taking reducing shower time by just a few minutes can have a huge impact. When I calculated my carbon footprint, the amount of time the water runs in the shower was the greatest contribution to carbon dioxide emissions in the home category.
    For transportation, walking whenever possible is always helpful, as this prevents emissions from going into the air from car exhaust.
  • Giulia O. Italy Giulia O. Italy Nov. 5, 2013
    Hi Stephanie, I'm Giulia, thank you very much for the answer
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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Naina Asaravala, Oct. 20, 2013

Hello,
My name is Naina and I am a freshman at Las Lomas High School. I recently calculated my carbon footprint for a school project and the results were higher than the average californian. I was expecting to get around average, but I was not surprised when I got the results. overall, I was higher than average, but in some sections, such as food and purchases, I was below average. On the other hand, the “home” and “transportation” sections were both more than double the average californian.

Before I took the quiz, I knew right away that my home section would be more than average. my house is pretty big, and while I was counting the number of light bulbs, I realized that we had way more than I thought. There were 68 incandescent and 48 fluorescent. my dad tried to change the number of incandescent bulbs we had, but in some rooms, we put in dimmers, and they don’t work on fluorescent bulbs. My showers are pretty long, too, which I have been trying very hard to change. Also, my family likes to keep our phones and computers in the charger over night, so that uses a lot of electricity. I am hoping to lessen the use of carbon in this area by taking shorter showers, turing the lights off as often as I can, and only keeping my phone and computer in the charger when they need to charge.

My transportation was more than average as well. Although my family likes to carpool as often as possible, we still drive places a lot. Not only do we drive a lot, we like to go on trips and vacations that require airplane flights as well. I the past year, i have gone on 2 round-trip flights (four flights over all). I went to DC ( and back ) and to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico (and back ). both of those trips were very long flights, so they used a lot of gasoline. I am hoping to improve this section of my carbon footprint as well, by trying to use an alternative source of transportation when possible, such as biking. As for the plane trips, maybe we could go on vacations that aren’t as far away, or maybe take flights less often.

This quiz has made me more aware of how I live my daily life, and if I ever take this quiz again, I hope my carbon foot print has reduced by then.

Naina Asaravala
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Jason Hodin, Oct. 18, 2013

way to go team Stanford!

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2013/october/solar-home-results-101813.html
Jason Hodin
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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Kelly S-USA, Oct. 18, 2013

Hello, my name is Kelly and I’m from Texas. After calculating my carbon footprint, i released that the most contributing factor was transportation. My carbon footprint for transportation was 8939 kg and in my region it is 6387 kg. I had 6 flights last year which is a lot for me. I usually just take 2 flights each year, but last year was an exception. This year so far i have only had 2 flights and I probably won’t go anywhere for the rest of the year, so if i were to calculate my carbon footprint with that information then it would probably go down a bit. Transportation was the only contributing factor that was above average of my region. I have done research and now know that transportation is one of the main causes for carbon footprints being so high. I now know to watch and conserve energy in the transportation department. Not only on airplanes but in cars, buses and trains.

http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/ghgemissions/sources/transportation.html
Kelly S-USA
Comments (2)
  • Daniel Oliner Daniel Oliner Oct. 19, 2013
    Hi Kelly,
    My footprint was similar to yours in that the flights I took last year caused my footprint to be larger than expected. Though limiting the amount of flights I take could help the solution somewhat, I think airlines using more efficient, climate-friendly methods is the way to go in solving this problem.
  • Lile D Lile D Oct. 19, 2013
    Hello Kelly,
    My name is Lile Donohue. I am a freshman in high school and currently live in California, USA. After taking the Carbon Footprint Quiz, my results were similar to yours in the way that transportation was the biggest factor in which my carbon footprint was higher than the average American. In all of the other categories, such as Home, Food, and Purchases, I was actually lower than the average Californian. For our home energy use, we have a relatively average-sized house that needs no air conditioning whatsoever. However, we do use a fireplace during the winter, which would have quite a big effect on our carbon emission levels if it weren't for the fact that our stove is made so that it is low-emission to the outdoors. In fact, even by just owning this environmentally-friendly stove receives a tax refund from the U.S. government. For purchases, we only buy as much as we really need. But my family travels- a lot. Every summer, my family flies to Japan and stay there for a few months. To get to the city we stay at, there are three long plane trips and other bus and train trips. Obviously, we travel the same way back. Then there are the long road trips, and those frequent trips to the grocery store, or a friend's house, or to get to a lesson of some sort. Because of this, my family emits 6800 kg of carbon per year all on transportation! That's more than 2 and 1/2 times more than the average Californian spends on transportation annually, and 1.8 times the average person on Earth spends on home, purchases, food, AND transportation COMBINED. All because of traveling.
    To decrease our carbon emission, can we just stay at home, and not go anywhere for the rest of our lives? Obviously not. The problem we humans have is the fact that we only care about the profit and not how it harms the Earth. It seems to be that the decisions made are for the present and no thinking on how it will affect people in the future. This isn't the way we should be dealing with these huge problems. We need to find an efficient energy source that will sustain the people on this planet for a long, long time. But, it's hard for people like you and me to suddenly get an awesome idea on a reliable energy source and start working on it. What we can do, though, is spread the word. We need to let people know what's actually going on. And then there is recycling. I think it's a great idea, we should lower the amount we have to throw away in the first place. Or lowering the amount of energy we use. Can we turn off that computer for an hour more than usual? Think about how much that would save if everyone in America who owned a computer or laptop did that every day. It doesn't even have to be for an hour- it could be for half an hour, fifteen minutes, one minute, even. It would still make a difference. And making a small difference will count as a lot in the future. Thank you,
    Lile Donohue (10-19-2013)

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Discussions Discussion Tansportation Emissions
Kathryn A-USA, Oct. 17, 2013

Hello! I’m Kathryn California! I was very surprised to to find that my biggest emissions came from transportation. It may be because i took 2 flights over the summer but after thinking about it, there are so many ways I could cut down my footprint in terms of transportation. Overall my footprint was over average so there are many ways I can lower it. I tend to leave most of my electronics plugged in, so simply taking those out of the wall will help tremendously. In this article I read, 28% of of U.S. green house gas emissions were from transportation alone. That statistic is way to high so I’ll now do my best to help lower that percentage.
Globally, transportation emits ridiculous amounts of greenhouse gases so not just to my fellow Americans, but friends all over the world, we should work to lower those emissions.To do so we can walk or ride bikes places and carpool to school and events. I hope we can all work to reduce our footprints!

http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/ghgemissions/sources/transportation.html
Kathryn A-USA
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Veronica C-USA, Oct. 17, 2013

Everyone in my community drives to where they need to be. The problem is that we are only 25.64 sq km large. It takes approximately 20 minutes tops to walk through downtown, and about 5 minutes to get from the local market back to the suburban area of town. It would take even less time biking, which 90% of the community knows how to do. Which makes you wonder, why doesn’t everyone do this. I mean, yes it can get to about 40 degrees Celsius, but during the fall and spring the weather is very nice. We need to get out more, that would lower the town’s carbon footprint by about, oh, a lot to be frank.

Veronica C-USA
Comments (2)
  • Adam S-USA Adam S-USA Oct. 17, 2013
    I agree with you Veronica because like you said it would make much more sense to walk or ride your bike. Also it saves time so I just don't get why people still use their cars all the time. If 90% of the community knows how to ride bikes I wonder how many people do ride their bike everywhere.
  • Caitlin Bond Caitlin Bond Feb. 26, 2014
    I think that overall, the usage of automobiles is used solely for convenience. While I do completely agree that lowering the use of cars would be a great positive impact on the environment, I do see where people find a need for efficiency in the fast paced lives people live today.

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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Rebecka WF-Sweden, Oct. 14, 2013

If I were to live in a city that is ideal when it comes to carbon emissions, there would firstly be transportation with bio-fuel or electricity only. You don’t need to walk or ride your bike everywhere, as long as you keep CO2 emissions low by not using fossil fuel. Public buildings such as schools, hospitals, malls, grocery stores should be built with energy efficient solutions in mind. Windows as well as walls with a lot of isolation to keep the cold out in the winter, and the heat out during the summer. Not only would that keep down the emissions, but also the cost for all the households. The air and the environment in this city would be a lot cleaner, since there’s almost no exhaust from petrol cars, and the sound level of electrical cars is a lot lower. I would definitely prefer to live in a city like this. It would feel better knowing, that your house don’t have a negative impact on the climate change with you just being able to live there. Or that every time you take the bus to work, fossil oil is not wasted.
There are so many solutions out there, in progress and waiting to be discovered. The only problem is both research and restoration and renovation cost a fortune. To make an entire city eco friendly would be a huge project. But i think that’s what’s needed to be done in the future to keep the temperatures down. Give people no other better, cheaper option but to live as “eco friends”.

Rebecka WF-Sweden
Comments (7)
  • Kathryn A-USA Kathryn A-USA Oct. 17, 2013
    Wouldn't we all love to live in this place! There are so many simple things we can do individually to lower our emissions. We can reduce the amount of meat we eat by having at least 1 vegetarian day per week. Not only will this reduce our footprint but prove great for our health as well! Double whammy! Instead of just flinging everything in the trash bin we can be thoughtful to what can be recycled like glass, paper, plastic and aluminum. The simple actions are the ones that grow into big things. Even if we all can't go out and make huge advancements in our communities to reduce our footprint, we can do things individually and inspire others to do the same.
  • Devyn Fisher Devyn Fisher Oct. 18, 2013
    I think you have some good ideas in the post. We all definitely need to cut down on our emissions, and not using fossil fuels is a good start. However, the hard part of making an entire city like this is that all of these things are very expensive. I think there needs to be an agreement between several countries to all enforce carbon changes. The main thing that will change how much carbon is released is what the public does. Everyone here can make a big difference in the world if we all make a small change.
  • Lysandra A Lysandra A Oct. 22, 2013
    Hi! I'm from California, US. Having a city like this would be great but what about the rest of the world? It would make some difference but all the other cities would stay the same. Like Dylan said it would be very difficult to get a whole city to start reducing their carbon footprints. Devyn also pointed out that it would be expensive to make an entire city eco-friendly but it's similar to solar panels. It's pretty expensive to buy them but in the long run they do help reduce your electricity bill and they are good for the environment. Hopefully in the near future we can accomplish a city like this.
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Discussions Discussion Sustainable city
Catherine Bebbington, Oct. 14, 2013

Hi, my name is Catherine and I’m from the United States. I agree with what you have said in your post. We have the alternatives for the harmful way that we live, its just making the switch. Cities are one of the most polluted areas in the world so we need to make the switch their first to healthier and earthfriendly methods. Its not hard to make this switch and I beleive does only take one person to make this change. It takes one person to start and than others will follow. I do believe that our time is rumming out and that creating sustainable cities in important before its too late.

Catherine Bebbington
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