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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Tony Trevari, March 15, 2012

Al Jazeera channel losing staff over ‘bias’ on Syria:

The bureau’s managing director, Hassan Shaaban reportedly resigned last week after leaked emails revealed his frustrations over the news channel’s coverage of Syria.

“The head of the bureau in Beirut quit, many other people quit because of the biased coverage and outright hand of the government in dictating editorial policy over Libya, and now Syria.”

http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/321062

http://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=x--Td_8JXYk
Tony Trevari
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Tony Trevari, March 15, 2012

Leaked emails indicate Syria president got advice from Iran to supress uprising:

More than 3,000 emails that activists hacked from private accounts belonging to Syria’s President Assad show that he took advice from Iran on how to handle the uprising against his rule. Assad also received details about Western journalists in Homs and was urged to “tighten the security grip” on the opposition-held city in November.

http://http://worldnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/03/14/10689612-report-leaked-emails-indicate-syria-president-got-advice-from-iran
Tony Trevari
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Discussions Discussion Global Geopolitics
Steurt Strickland, Dec. 23, 2011

Oil and geopolitics: a turbulent year, and no end in sight

Kazakhstan unrest — violence in the western city of Zhanaozen in which some 14 protesting oil workers were killed — caps an extraordinarily turbulent year in the world’s oil regions.

The distribution of power has been shaken up in the Magreb countries of Egypt, Libya and Tunisia, and violence continues to threaten the rulers of Syria and Yemen.

Saudi Arabia is spending some $130 billion to stave off its own public dissatisfaction.

In Russia, Prime Minister Vladimir Putin’s seemingly unassailable hold on power has been challenged by a botched decision to return to the Kremlin, and a rigged parliamentary election.

All in all, the uprisings have helped to push annual average oil prices to their highest level in history, exceeding $100 a barrel.

Look for the global turbulence to continue well into next year… good analysis at the URL:

http://oilandglory.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2011/12/22/oil_and_geopolitics_a_turbulent_year_and_no_end_in_sight

This week’s eyewitness video of police killing and beating of protesting Kazakhstan oil workers

http://youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=XKXzcylIjPE
Steurt Strickland
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
srini n, Dec. 20, 2011

Freedom: who could object? Yet this word is now used to justify a thousand forms of exploitation. Throughout the rightwing press and blogosphere, among thinktanks and governments, the word excuses every assault on the lives of the poor, every form of inequality and intrusion to which the 1% subject us. How did libertarianism, once a noble impulse, become synonymous with injustice?

In the name of freedom – freedom from regulation – the banks were permitted to wreck the economy. In the name of freedom, taxes for the super-rich are cut. In the name of freedom, companies lobby to drop the minimum wage and raise working hours. In the same cause, US insurers lobby Congress to thwart effective public healthcare; the government rips up our planning laws; big business trashes the biosphere. This is the freedom of the powerful to exploit the weak, the rich to exploit the poor.”

https://apps.facebook.com/theguardian/commentisfree/2011/dec/19/bastardised-libertarianism-makes-freedom-oppression?code=AQA8LlpQwF059VZ2AxC_ADVKhNgzdsahKgfcfEPYSVpoAOCEKY87HsqXj5FY2R0J_e6hCABt1YZk8qJ
srini n
Comments (2)
  • Jessie Rhodes Jessie Rhodes Dec. 20, 2011
    Thanks for sharing this… A very astutely argued essay, which leads to a poignant conclusion…

    “Modern libertarianism is the disguise adopted by those who wish to exploit without restraint. It pretends that only the state intrudes on our liberties. It ignores the role of banks, corporations and the rich in making us less free. It denies the need for the state to curb them in order to protect the freedoms of weaker people…”

    The author, George Monbiot, whom I had never heard of before, is one of today's finest activist philosophers. I'll be reading more of his work!
  • srini n srini n Dec. 20, 2011
    I seem to have not given the correct link. Here is the link to the article in The Guardian
    http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/dec/19/bastardised-libertarianism-makes-freedom-oppression

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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
JP Lopez, Dec. 8, 2011

President Assad Denies Ordering Deadly Force:

He’s on an American PR mission denying any involvement with the violent, government backed crack down on public protest that has plagued Syria for the past several months. Sounds kind of desperate.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=TT4GyNXgRfQ
JP Lopez
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Bert Breton, Nov. 4, 2011

Arab Spring Activists Sit Down With Silicon Valley Suits:

Last week, tech executives and Internet activists swarmed San Francisco for the first ever Silicon Valley Human Rights Conference. The two-day event focused on the increasingly complex relationship between the Internet and human rights. Access, an advocacy organization for Internet rights, hosted the conference, and drew representatives from influential players in Silicon Valley and activists arriving from revolution or government oppression in places like Egypt, Syria, Uganda, and Thailand. The event touched on issues like Internet access, freedom of speech, and corporate responsibility, but mostly just made clear that this is only the beginning of the digital rights conversation. Video coverage below…

http://news.yourolivebranch.org/2011/11/03/arab-spring-activists-sit-down-with-silicon-valley-suits/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWF1Gp4vIrQ
Bert Breton
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Nina Dumas, Oct. 8, 2011

Syria’s protesters turn to Facebook to expose ‘citizen spies’: Activists use the internet to find and unmask those they suspect of reporting their neighbours to security forces

During nearly half a century of one-party rule, Syria’s Ba’ath regime has maintained its iron grip on a nation of 22 million people through a network of civilian informers known as the awainiyya – the watchers.

As the uprising against Assad’s regime approaches its eighth month, security services are relying ever more heavily on their network of citizen spies to suppress protests, activists said.

As the attempted revolution in Syria transforms power relations in one of the world’s last police states, protesters are using social media to fight back. Facebook now hosts dozens of sites run by Syrian activists on which the names, addresses and photos of suspected informers are posted.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CuP5BI2UXAk
Nina Dumas
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Marco Masoni, Sept. 30, 2011

Is this finally going to push the Syrian regime over the edge?

(Reuters) - More than 10,000 soldiers have deserted the Syrian army and defectors are attacking security police who enforce loyalty to President Bashar al-Assad, a high-ranking defector said on Friday.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/30/us-syria-officer-idUSTRE78T3XE20110930
Marco Masoni
Comments (2)
  • Tim Foufas Tim Foufas Oct. 1, 2011
    I think it will take a lot more than that to topple the gov. They just have too much to lose.
  • Marco Masoni Marco Masoni Oct. 1, 2011
    They've also got a well financed, well trained and disciplined military that is loyal to the government.

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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Marco Masoni, Sept. 25, 2011

An enlightened regime in Saudi Arabia?

http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/world/2011/09/25/jamjoom-saudi-woman-vote.cnn?iref=videosearch
Marco Masoni
Comments (2)
  • Henry Hamilton Henry Hamilton Sept. 26, 2011
    This is mind blowing news! The Arab Spring has truly been a wake up call to the Saudis and has forced the issue of securing basic civil rights for their citizens. But the road to democracy is long.
  • Camilla Pashar Camilla Pashar Sept. 26, 2011
    Saudi women have also been given the right to run in the next election. This decision covers the following: first, the right of women to become members in the Shura Council and secondly, the right of women to announce their candidacy to become members of the local municipality councils. But the devil may be in the details. What kind of activities, and what kind of delegations will be given to women who become members of the Shura and municipal councils. Will they be left in the shadows within these councils?

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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Bert Breton, Sept. 11, 2011

Syrian human rights campaigners say Syria’s ruling hierarchy has stepped up efforts to crush demonstrations in recent weeks, including more frequent military raids, targeted assassinations of protest leaders and the arrest of thousands of Syrians. According to activists heavy shelling has taken place in villages and old districts demanding the removal of President Assad. Shocking and disturbing images have also emerged of alleged summary executions of civilians by the army.

http://www.euronews.net/2011/09/08/new-videos-point-to-atrocities-by-syrian-forces/
Bert Breton
Comments (3)
  • Marco Masoni Marco Masoni Sept. 12, 2011
    Given the universal condemnation, you've got to wonder what kind of political calculation Syrian leaders have made…
  • Bert Breton Bert Breton Sept. 13, 2011
    It's crazy that the military seems to be carrying out summary execution of civilians in the streets. Even if this may not have been fully verified, it's sad that the situation has deteriorated to a point where such a reality could be realistically considered as true. I think that after decades of autocratic military rule, the Syrian leaders are unable to make constructive political calculations to resolve the protests. It's amazing to see the difference in how the leaders of Morocco and Syria have handled their respective popular protests. The Moroccan king should be applauded for his positive approach to the situation.
  • Marco Masoni Marco Masoni Sept. 13, 2011
    But I also hear a lot about how the main cities in Syria (Damascus and Aleppo) have not really joined protests. The middle class and merchants there are holding back and, essentially, propping up the regime. At the end of the day, a popular uprising requires true popular support.

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