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Posts tagged "switzerland"

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Discussions Discussion Dialects of the World
Jenny Rothberg, March 23, 2012

Making sense of the language confusion - Switzerland

http://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/culture/Making_sense_of_the_language_confusion.html?cid=32286756
Jenny Rothberg
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Discussions Discussion Space Travel
Kim Hsu, Feb. 17, 2012

Swiss aim to launch first space cleaner:

Swiss scientists announced Wednesday plans to develop a machine that acts almost like a vacuum cleaner to scoop up thousands of abandoned satellite and rocket parts, cleaning up outer space. Thank you Switzerland!

http://www.hindustantimes.com/technology/IndustryTrends/Swiss-aim-to-launch-first-space-cleaner/SP-Article1-812798.aspx

http://youtube.com/watch?v=RBoL8dp_9Gk&feature=player_embedded
Kim Hsu
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  • Margaret Sewell Margaret Sewell Feb. 17, 2012
    It's encouraging to see a space agency allocating resources to the issue of space debris and space pollution. The Swiss Space Agency must be commended for focusing on this issue.

    NASA and private corporations have been launching satellites into space orbit at an alarming rate since the 1970's. Yet, I have never noticed a serious effort on their part to tackle the issue of space debris. They've only been concerned with establishing guidelines on how to deal with potential collision threat from debris.

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Discussions Discussion Physics I: Classical Mechanics
Dan Thompson, Nov. 18, 2011

Is ‘the new physics’ here? Atom smashers get a big surprise!!! The world’s largest atom smasher, the Large Hadron Collider, the 17-mile (27 km) circular particle accelerator underground near Geneva, Switzerland, is designed as a portal to a new view of physics. And it has produced its first peek at the unexpected: bits of matter that don’t mirror the behavior of their antimatter counterparts.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45347624/ns/technology_and_science-science/#.TsZ2W1Za8dU

The discovery, if confirmed, could rewrite the known laws of particle physics and help explain why our universe is made mostly of matter and not antimatter. Here’s a great documentary of the Large Hadron Collider

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_fJ6PMfnz2E
Dan Thompson
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Discussions Discussion Dialects of the World
Jenny Rothberg, Sept. 27, 2011

Swiss Effort to Save a Language Opens a Rift: Villagers Debate Whether to Stick to Dialects of Ancient Roman Tongue or a Cobbled-Together ‘Esperanto’

ZURICH—As kids return to school in Val Müstair, high in the eastern tip of the Swiss Alps, they are also entering the front lines of a bitter battle: the fight over the future of a centuries-old Latin dialect.

The municipality (population 1,600) is a stronghold of Romansh, a language imported by Roman occupiers 2,000 years ago and still spoken by most locals. Today, its villagers are up in arms over authorities’ attempt to push a sort of Romansh Esperanto on locals—one that officials defend as the only chance to save one of the last living relics of the Latin language.

The tiff originated in 1996, when Romansh became Switzerland’s fourth official language even though only roughly 60,000 people speak it.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111903352704576540252076676760.html
Jenny Rothberg
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Discussions Discussion Dialects of the World
Jenny Rothberg, May 31, 2011

Standard German has been banned from Zurich, Switzerland preschools in favor of Swiss German. The outcome of the Sunday referendum was welcomed by the “Yes to dialect in the kindergarten” group that argued for the change. Swiss German, is almost unintelligible in most of Germany and remains a strong element of the Swiss identity. More here:

http://www.thelocal.ch/202/20110517/
Jenny Rothberg
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