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Discussions Discussion Logic and Statistics Explained
Mario Zolt, Feb. 4, 2012

Elementary Statistics Module: a course to learn the basic of statistics

http://bobhall.tamu.edu/FiniteMath/Module8/
Mario Zolt
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Discussions Discussion Logic and Statistics Explained
Steurt Strickland, Dec. 11, 2011

It seems likely that the first people to study probability were motivated by gambling.

This particular article will not prepare anyone to win at a casino. However, the foundation to avoid losing is to realize that the professionals already know the odds.

Fun [but long] article introducing basic mathematical concepts in probability…

http://www.decodedscience.com/introducing-probability-theory-without-statistics/7008
Steurt Strickland
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Discussions Discussion Logic and Statistics Explained
Tom Gary, Dec. 9, 2011

Statistics Sells. That’s why it’s being used to also track well-being & happiness!

University of Pennsylvania duo Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers have analysed happiness surveys conducted in 132 countries. Their statistical study shows the impact of economic growth on happiness.

http://www.smh.com.au/national/putting-a-figure-on-inequality-adds-to-strength-of-statistical-spotlight-20111208-1olgo.html

For example, on a 0-to-10 life satisfaction scale, respondents in Mali and Ethiopia place themselves between 3 and 4; residents of Egypt, South Africa and Portugal put themselves between 5 and 6; and people in Australia, the US and most other developed countries place themselves between 7 and 8. A 10 per cent increase in GDP buys as much additional happiness in a rich country as a poor one.

So, money can buy you happiness…statistically speaking!

http://youtube.com/watch?v=QKLq8V2uwa0
Tom Gary
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Discussions Discussion Logic and Statistics Explained
Mario Zolt, Nov. 22, 2011

Statistics is the study of data analysis; there are two kinds of statistics descriptive and inferential. Graphs and charts, averages, dispersion of data, probability and its distributions etc.

At this link you can find some good article about statistics.

http://www.emathzone.com/tutorials/basic-statistics
Mario Zolt
Comments (1)
  • Andrew Castillo Andrew Castillo Nov. 22, 2011
    Perusing the site, I take issue with the claim (under Limitations of Statistics) that “Statistical methods are best applicable on quantitative data.” The use of dummy variables in regression analysis is common and as far as I know their use doesn't make the regression model any less applicable.

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Discussions Discussion Logic and Statistics Explained
Mauro De Giorgi, Nov. 21, 2011

Human life is full of decisions, including significant choices about what to believe. Although everyone prefers to believe what is true, we often disagree with each other about what that is in particular instances… [read the full article]

http://www.philosophypages.com/lg/index.htm
Mauro De Giorgi
Comments (10)
  • abeer alhamzawi abeer alhamzawi Nov. 23, 2011
    no , its doesn't mean that is not possible but it mean its not fact
  • Mario Zolt Mario Zolt Nov. 23, 2011
    We don't know if it's a fact or not, the only thing that we know for sure is that we don't know, because nobody know what is inside a star.
  • srini n srini n Dec. 9, 2011
    What is posted above makes for interesting reading! I am neither a logician. statistician or a philosopher. Just a curious layman. But what I recollect as having read some 20 yrs ago or more (cant remember the book title) is truth is independent of proof and acknowledgement. Like if it had rained in a Brazilian forest at 8 am today, it happens to be a truthful fact whether anyone was there to notice it or record it. The distinction between fact and truth was made in the book I read but presently I am not able to recollect what it was. But what i do recall is fact is considered a limited context sensitive reality whereas truth is something which transcends time and space. I wish I cd recall more or cite the source but I am sorry my memory fails me (as it does quite often!)
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Discussions Discussion Logic and Statistics Explained
Mario Zolt, Oct. 31, 2011

Logical Reasoning

Logical reasoning is the process which uses arguments, statements, premises and axioms to define weather a statement is true or false, resulting in a logical or illogical reasoning. In today’s logical reasoning three different types of reasoning can be distinguished, known as deductive reasoning, inductive reasoning and abductive reasoning based on respectively deduction, induction and abduction.

http://www.fibonicci.com/logical-reasoning/
Mario Zolt
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Discussions Discussion Logic and Statistics Explained
Billy Sumner, Oct. 30, 2011

Mathemagician and professor Arthur Benjamin is spot-on in his belief that statistics must become the central branch of mathematics for the 21st century rather than the calculus centric view of the 20th century. This 3 minute video clip of him at TED is worth a watch.

http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/eng/arthur_benjamin_s_formula_for_changing_math_education.html
Billy Sumner
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Discussions Discussion Logic and Statistics Explained
Mario Zolt, Oct. 10, 2011

What is a logical fallacy?

All arguments have the same basic structure: A therefore B. They begin with one or more premises (A), which is a fact or assumption upon which the argument is based. They then apply a logical principle (therefore) to arrive at a conclusion (B). An example of a logical principle is that of equivalence. For example, if you begin with the premises that A=B and B=C, you can apply the logical principle of equivalence to conclude that A=C. A logical fallacy is a false or incorrect logical principle. An argument that is based upon a logical fallacy is therefore not valid. It is important to note that if the logic of an argument is valid then the conclusion must also be valid, which means that if the premises are all true then the conclusion must also be true. Valid logic applied to one or more false premises, however, leads to an invalid argument. Also, if an argument is not valid the conclusion may, by chance, still be true.

For a more thorough discussion of logical fallacies and how to structure a logical argument, see the New England Skeptical Society’s article, How To Argue.

http://www.theskepticsguide.org/resources/logicalfallacies.aspx
Mario Zolt
Comments (1)
  • D Okamura D Okamura Oct. 19, 2011
    Mario, this is a good resource on logical fallacies, not just for symbolic logic, but for language students who are learning how to construct sound arguments in essays. After all, essay comes from the French word for attempt (to convince) and the Latin for (to weigh).

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Discussions Discussion Logic and Statistics Explained
Mario Zolt, Oct. 7, 2011

An Intuitive Explanation of Bayes’ Theorem

Bayes’ Theorem
for the curious and bewildered;
an excruciatingly gentle introduction.

Your friends and colleagues are talking about something called “Bayes’ Theorem” or “Bayes’ Rule”, or something called Bayesian reasoning. They sound really enthusiastic about it, too, so you google and find a webpage about Bayes’ Theorem and…

http://yudkowsky.net/rational/bayes
Mario Zolt
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Discussions Discussion Digital Africa
Bert Breton, Oct. 5, 2011

Ivan Colic talks at TEDx about Afrographique; how African success stories can be communicated by data and statistics. He looks at how Africans are impacted by stuff like social networks, mobile, internet, etc. But the key is converting complex data into something that’s simple and engaging to communicate a story about Africans.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNpUobBUX4U
Bert Breton
Comments (2)
  • Marco Masoni Marco Masoni Oct. 6, 2011
    Turn complex data into clear, compelling and convincing visuals. That's good advice.
  • Bert Breton Bert Breton Oct. 6, 2011
    Presenting complex data in beautiful, easy to understand visuals - as opposed to boring charts and pie graphs, is the only way to' invite all customers to enjoy discovering overwhelming statistics

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