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Discussions Discussion Modern Poetry
Reese Turlington, March 15, 2012

Robert Hass, a great poet, served as Poet Laureate of the United States from 1995 to 1997. He lives in California with his wife, poet Brenda Hillman, and teaches at the University of California, Berkeley. Here he reads his poem Time and Materials.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=wL-kRhcitFE&feature=related
Reese Turlington
Comments (2)
  • Mark Collins Mark Collins March 15, 2012
    Genius phrasing and rhythm starting around 1:50. I've never been exposed to Mr. Haas' works. Super stuff!
  • Jill Davies Jill Davies March 15, 2012
    That's Haas’s use of a jump-cut, or collage, to bring together disparate information, imagery and dreamwork, while leaving inexplicit the criteria for inclusion. It’s kind of like Hass builds a playground structure from lots of different sources and allows the listener to decide how to use it. Another way to think about it is that meaning occurs at the interface with each reader, who acts a co-creator along with the poet.

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Discussions Discussion Modern Poetry
Sarah Richards, Feb. 4, 2012

James Joyce’s Poems Get a Musical Facelift

In 1907, shortly after publishing a book of love poetry titled Chamber Music, Irish writer James Joyce penned a letter to his brother Stanislaus: “Some of the verses are pretty enough to be put to music. I hope someone will do so, someone that knows old English music such as I like.” A century later, a group of independent electronic, folk and rock musicians have done just that.

All 36 verses from Joyce’s book of poetry have been put to music by artists such as Peter Buck from R.E.M. and Lee Ranaldo from Sonic Youth. Click the following link to listen to some of Joyce’s stanzas put to music:
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91757715

You can hear the full story from NPR below…

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=91757715
Sarah Richards
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Discussions Discussion Modern Poetry
Christie James, Dec. 22, 2011

Deborah Ager, born in 1971, co-founded the poetry magazine known as 32 Poems in 2003. Her manuscript, Midnight Voices, was published by Cherry Grove Collections. She’s one of my preferred young American poets.

Summer Nights, by Deborah Ager

Lamoni, Iowa

The factory siren tells workers time to go home
tells them the evening has begun.
When living with the tall man

whom I didn’t love, I would wander
the streets, dreaming of Italy.
Trekking the handful of avenues

with him, he would say look there
between pink cobblestones,
there’s manure like mortar.

The sweet smell of it Wednesday nights,
the night before auction,
when the misery of cows greets me

heading home through town.
Lake quiets, tired of my lies.
When will I tell truths again?

The siren. My love is home.
Nights, we stay in and X the days.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/50834982@N00/6553520095/in/photostream
Christie James
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Discussions Discussion Modern Poetry
Janet Pearson, Nov. 29, 2011

Famous writer and former Vermont Poet Laureate Ruth Stone has passed away. She was 96. Stone wrote poems for decades but it wasn’t until she reached her 80s and 90s that she saw success. Now her books are sold in places nationwide, including bookstores in her own state, such as Phoenix Books in Essex Junction. In her many years, Stone wrote of love, death and nature.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyzXn3rAGQM
Janet Pearson
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Discussions Discussion Modern Poetry
Jill Davies, Nov. 15, 2011

Denise Duhamel is a poet whose work I enjoy greatly. This poem starts as lines streaming together to form a story. You do not know anything except what the author is telling you. “She tries to pee in the trash can but misses”, “she puts her socks over her shoes”, “she wears all her necklaces at once”, “she hides her rings in the toaster slots”. This poem is written in Mobius Strip because it does not matter which order these lines are said in, you still get the same message and you still get the full story.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LepRPKx4UFU
Jill Davies
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Discussions Discussion Modern Poetry
Bert Breton, Nov. 5, 2011

Modern [and very controversial] for his time, Walt Whitman lived in Washington, DC from 1863 to 1873. He arrived to search for his brother George, reportedly wounded in the fighting around Fredericksburg, VA. His original intention to stay two weeks stretched into ten years. While in Washington, DC Whitman created some of his most memorable works. During this period he wrote Drum-Taps, Democratic Vistas, and Passage to India. Here, John Graham presents “Democratic Vistas” by Walt Whitman.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Fq-Ree3gE8
Bert Breton
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