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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Isabelle A, Feb. 10, 2014

After calculating my carbon footprint, which was slightly below average for a Californian, I noticed that carbon emissions from my food was a minuscule portion of my total emissions. I do make an effort to be as environmentally friendly in my daily life, but had never thought about the carbon I put into the atmosphere by nourishing myself. The reason that my total emissions were so low is that I don’t actually like eating meat very much, I value organic and local food, and eat a healthy amount of calories.
But even though the carbon emissions generated by my dietary habits is low, that doesn’t mean that I have model eating habits for one of 7 billion people. There is not enough space on earth for everyone to grow enough fruit and vegetables to feed everyone - these foods are not very nutrient-dense and take a lot of space to grow. Furthermore, not everyone is lucky enough to live in such an agriculturally productive place as California, where fresh fruits and vegetables can be grown locally throughout the year. But, if I were to eat foods that take up less space and fewer resources per calorie, I wouldn’t be able to get all of the nutrition I need. The distribution of food around the world is an enormous problem that we need to work on solving.

Isabelle A
Comments (1)
  • Katja M-Slovenia Katja M-Slovenia Feb. 14, 2014
    Hello. My results were very similar to yours especially in the food section as I, too, don't really like meat that much and that reduced my carbon footprint a lot. I agree with you about the food distribution problem around the world that needs to be solved. This isn't going to be easy because it affects pretty much everyone, but if everyone would just try their best I believe we could succeed. It's becoming a bigger problem every day.

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Discussions Discussion Nutrition and Medicine
Dash E-seattle, WA, May 3, 2012

I tend to notice that many poeple look for health in the bottom of a prescription bottle :/ which is not good (most times). More people need to see that the BEST way to be healthy and happy is by simply excercising and eating right :) Instead of playing XBOX or watching youtube, get up for 30 minutes a day and jog around, do some yoga, martial arts, anything to get your heart pumping!

Dash E-seattle, WA
Comments (2)
  • AnyaA Seattle, WA AnyaA Seattle, WA May 3, 2012
    i agree, the best health you can get is from the physical exercise and eating healthy foods every day, and get good nutritions to keep your body healthy instead of using medication(unless you really do need it..)
  • Jacqueline T Jacqueline T May 4, 2012
    definitely and joining a sport can really help with this and just eating healthy will help too.

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Discussions Discussion Nutrition and Medicine
Sami Rourke, March 20, 2012

Coke and Pepsi change recipe to avoid cancer warning

The Centre for Science in the Public Interest, a consumer advocacy group, in February filed a petition with the US Food and Drug Administration to ban the use of ammonia-sulfite caramel colouring.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=7gQy2fBpmsI
Sami Rourke
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Discussions Discussion Nutrition and Medicine
Bob Butterworth, Feb. 20, 2012

Foods you should eat everyday

You can eliminate several health problems by simply knowing the power of nutrition. In order to look and feel your best, start incorporating some of these “super” foods into your diet.
These are simple tips that are easy to live by!

http://www.hometown-pages.com/main.asp?SectionID=14&SubSectionID=59&ArticleID=41915

http://youtube.com/watch?v=_o6eKL-IdIY
Bob Butterworth
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Discussions Discussion Nutrition and Medicine
Joseph Curtis, Feb. 17, 2012

The Future of Nutrition Labels: Making It Easier to Be Portion-Savvy

The Nutrition Labeling and Education Act of 1990 required nutrition information to be on packaged foods only. So, why do some items not need a label? What are the laws set by the FDA and USDA?

The government is finally establishing more label laws. A mandatory meat nutrition label, due to go in effect Jan. 1, 2012, was pushed back until March 1, 2012 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. This rule will concern 40 of the most popular cuts of all “single-ingredient muscle cuts and ground meat and poultry products.” The label will include calories, total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, sodium, protein, iron and total carb content.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/carrie-wiatt-ms/nutrition-labels_b_1282243.html

http://youtube.com/watch?v=rNlElRhtEss
Joseph Curtis
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Discussions Discussion Food As Medicine: the Daily Blueberry Smoothi…
K Young, Dec. 24, 2011

I try to make a daily blueberry smoothie, although sometimes I skip days for whatever reason. But it is should be a daily thing, after all blueberries are a nutrient-dense superfood. And the smoothie is packed with antioxidants that combat free radicals/helps prevent disease…

The other day I made a smoothie that went beyond my normal smoothie, which is often: frozen or fresh blueberries, raspberries, banana, almond milk, raw kale, plain yogurt, and pineapple or papaya (if I have it) and Vit. C powder (if it’s handy).

Since celery lowers blood pressure, and it’s said apples help too, a friend suggested what he adds to his smoothie - an apple (cut up), and the blends celery in while the blender is going. I had never thought of adding apple or celery. Sure, I add kale, and you can’t even taste it, but get the benefits. My friend said he makes a smoothie once a week and stores it in the fridge. I would rather do it fresh daily, hence, I don’t always get around to it.

Tried adding a couple small sticks of celery and a baby honeycrisp apple the other day to the mix - you can taste a bit of the celery, but I didn’t mind. Trying to adapt the food as medicine philosophy for prevention…amazing how much you can pack into one smoothie.

K Young
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Discussions Discussion Nutrition and Medicine
Rafi Chandio, Dec. 9, 2011

Why not eat insects?

Marcel Dicke makes an appetizing case for adding insects to everyone’s diet. His message to squeamish chefs and foodies: delicacies like locusts and caterpillars compete with meat in flavor, nutrition and eco-friendliness.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=O6GimGZz6a8
Rafi Chandio
Comments (1)
  • Joseph Curtis Joseph Curtis Dec. 9, 2011
    This guy makes a lot of sense. As world populations rise and it becomes impossible to produce meat for everyone's dietary needs, the western world will have to join the 80% of the world who has already incorporated insects as a part of their regular diet. But, I must say, I tried a dried flavored ant a few years ago and gagged. Mental weakness.

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Discussions Discussion Search Engines, Technology, and Business
Tom Gary, Nov. 3, 2011

Yummly’s Semantic Search Engine Is The Ultimate Online Cookbook For Foodies. Similar to other recipe sites, Yummly aggregates recipes from around the web. But what differentiates the site is its powerful filters and search features. Not only can you filter results by type of food, course, and ingredient, but you can also break down recipes by diet, allergy, nutrition, price, cuisine, time, taste, and sources.

http://techcrunch.com/2010/06/21/yummlys-semantic-search-engine-is-the-ultimate-online-cookbook-for-foodies/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j7_nT7CzJ2E
Tom Gary
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Discussions Discussion Food and Gender
Emily Nelsen, Sept. 5, 2011

The link between food and gender is undeniable, and not something just for developed countries, this page goes briefly into how gender and food are linked even when there is a lack of food! Very interesting- its something I would love to have a discussion about with someone:the intersection of food, gender, and poverty.

http://www.ifad.org/gender/
Emily Nelsen
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Discussions Discussion Food and Gender
Emily Nelsen, Jan. 15, 2011

Really cool conference that I still need to watch. Very cool topic, “course” entitled: “Women, Men, and Food: Putting Gender on the Table” from Harvard’s Radcliffe institute of advanced studies.

http://athome.harvard.edu/food/
Emily Nelsen
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