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Discussions Discussion Islamic Ethics of War and Peace
Anita Singh, Feb. 22, 2012

The events in the Middle East, specifically in relation to the nuclear-based tensions between Iran, Israel and the United States, have me wondering if the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq will be followed by a third conflict. Then I read this article and it made me realize — perhaps the war is already underway. And there is no telling what an escalation might lead to.

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2012/02/201222072746430386.html
Anita Singh
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Discussions Discussion Fashion Design
Henry Hamilton, Nov. 18, 2011

Although Muslim women are often portrayed in the media as wearing nothing but black abbayas and burkas, Muslim women are claiming a place within the fashion industry. One of the first leading women in the design industry was Amina Al-Jassim a Saudi fashion designer, who has become an iconic figure for Muslim fashion in the Middle East. Here’s more…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gK6_83bL1l0
Henry Hamilton
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Bert Breton, Oct. 20, 2011

A senior National Transitional Council official in Libya has said that deposed Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi has died of his wounds after being captured near his hometown of Sirte.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6A5WXVuy_o&feature=player_embedded#!
Bert Breton
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Discussions Discussion Dance - Contemporary, Modern & Urban
Amy Sutherland, Oct. 7, 2011

Break dancing in the Middle East is slowly gaining public acceptance. To that end, 11 “crews” gathered in Dubai Mall on Oct. 1st to compete for the right to represent the Middle East at the Braun Boty grand final in Montpellier, France next month. The Over Boys dance crew won the show.

Ibrahim Taha, 21, an architect student from Oman and a member of the SNK Revo crew, says suspicion of the movement is so high police often stop his team practicing in parks.” I love dancing and I want to take our dancing abroad, but there is no platform for this kind of dance here,” Mr Taha said.

Alaa Samir, 23, says he and his Incredible Crew teammates have to wait until dark after the shops have closed, because there are so few places in Jordan that accept break dancing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qYdYOfqFRE
Amy Sutherland
Comments (1)
  • Demarcus L-U.S.A. Demarcus L-U.S.A. Oct. 20, 2011
    i think is this cool its some of the best break dancing i have seen. i feel like this is american imperialism at work.

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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Marco Masoni, Sept. 30, 2011

Is this finally going to push the Syrian regime over the edge?

(Reuters) - More than 10,000 soldiers have deserted the Syrian army and defectors are attacking security police who enforce loyalty to President Bashar al-Assad, a high-ranking defector said on Friday.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/30/us-syria-officer-idUSTRE78T3XE20110930
Marco Masoni
Comments (2)
  • Tim Foufas Tim Foufas Oct. 1, 2011
    I think it will take a lot more than that to topple the gov. They just have too much to lose.
  • Marco Masoni Marco Masoni Oct. 1, 2011
    They've also got a well financed, well trained and disciplined military that is loyal to the government.

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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Henry Hamilton, Sept. 25, 2011

The Arab Spring is turning into a bloody Autumn in Yemen. Eighteen people have been killed in Yemen during more anti-government protests. The surge in violence follows the return of President Ali Abdullah Saleh after a three-month absence. Al Jazeera’s Mohamed Vall reports.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=byGGzO41JBY&feature=player_embedded
Henry Hamilton
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Henry Hamilton, Sept. 22, 2011

Social Media and the Arab Spring: What Have We Learned?
By: Raymond Schillinger, of the HuffingtonPost

…For the legions of critics who had previously dismissed platforms like Facebook and Twitter as vapid troughs of celebrity gossip and self-aggrandizement, the toppling of regimes in Tunisia and Egypt suggested that these tools were as effective for organizing protests and revolutions as they were for organizing keg parties. The movements throughout the Arab world appeared to have imbued social media with an irrevocable sense of legitimacy as a tool for fomenting change.

As the ongoing tumult throughout the Middle East enters a sort of adolescence, however, the true role of social media in the revolutions is undergoing a necessary closer inspection…”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/raymond-schillinger/arab-spring-social-media_b_970165.html
Henry Hamilton
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Bert Breton, Sept. 19, 2011

Yemen faced renewed turmoil after government forces shot dead up to 26 protesters demanding the resignation of the country’s wounded president, Ali Abdullah Saleh. The Middle East revolts, which partly originated from online protests 9 months ago, continue.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xV2VF1ZQz_c&feature=player_embedded
Bert Breton
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Ricky Burkhardt, Sept. 16, 2011

Libyan Uprising Boosts Morale in Mideast. The apparent victory by rebels in Libya is sending shockwaves throughout the Middle East. An uprising that appeared to be lost is boosting the morale of protesters facing other Arab governments that have responded with severe repression…Protests in Bahrain also faced a brutal response, with military help from Saudi Arabia. And Yemen’s uprising has entered a stalemate. Great coverage from Voice of America…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MugY_H0ziiY
Ricky Burkhardt
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Discussions Discussion Internet’s Role in Popular Uprising
Amy Sutherland, Sept. 14, 2011

Believe the hype: Cairo is bigger than Berlin — The revolution, by the time it’s finished, won’t just change Egypt, not even just the region, but the whole world…

Egypt is the most populous Arab country, as well as the most central both geographically and culturally. It is the home of the Suez Canal. It is not the second largest recipient of US military aid in the world (after Israel) for no reason. Its dictatorship has been a cornerstone of US policy in the region since the 70s, and central to pushing American interests on a region that could and should - if free of colonial tinkering - emerge as one of the globe’s great centres of culture and trade, on a par with Europe or East Asia…

In 2011, the spirit of Tahrir Square has been echoed not just around the Middle East (including in Israel) but in Greece, Spain, Portugal, the UK, the US, Chile, Burkina Faso and more. And as the workers in Wisconsin receive letters of solidarity from their comrades in Mahalla, and the internet kicks into gear as both a tool for organising and challenge to the dominance of the media giants, these local uprisings are beginning to add up to a whole greater than the sum of its parts…

Click below for Austin Mackell’s brilliant full length essay…

http://www.abc.net.au/unleashed/2899192.html
Amy Sutherland
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