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Posts tagged "inquiry to insight"

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Discussions Discussion Einztein Blog
Marco Masoni, Jan. 27, 2012

EINZTEIN PRESS RELEASE

The Einztein social learning network connects students in 25+ countries as part of the International Student Carbon Footprint Challenge, an environmental science collaboration between Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg.

Einztein helps students around the world connect online to discuss ideas and share solutions about topics with real world relevance.

January 27, 2011 — Einztein (http://einztein.com), the social learning network, announces its exclusive partnership with Inquiry to Insight (http://i2i.stanford.edu/), an environmental science program at Stanford University and the University of Gothenburg. The program gives high school students and educators around the world the opportunity to participate in the International Student Carbon Footprint Challenge (http://footprint.stanford.edu), enabling students to learn about the impact of their lifestyle choices on their carbon footprints and to tackle shared environmental issues.

Guided by their teachers, students calculate their carbon footprints online to measure the impact of their transit, home, energy, food and personal purchase choices. Students then use the Einztein social learning network to meaningfully discuss their results with other students in classrooms around the world.

“We designed Einztein to make it easy for anyone to create an engaging social learning community centered around educational content,” said Marco Masoni, Co-Founder and CEO. “Students are using Einztein to make real world connections between the impact of their carbon footprints and the carbon footprints of their peers throughout the world.”

Jason Hodin at Stanford University’s Inquiry to Insight adds, “Einztein allows ISCFC students to exchange ideas and perspectives across borders in a way that is familiar to them, which is vital, given the global nature of many environmental challenges. We’ve seen students around the world share thoughtful, comprehensive responses to project questions. They contribute their own ideas for solutions to environmental problems and reference valuable resources they’ve found on the web.”

Schools, teachers and students can participate in the next challenge on February 6th. Lesson plan materials may be found on the Stanford University website (http://footprint.stanford.edu), including instructions for joining the discussions hosted on Einztein.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/61668055@N05/6772212011/
Marco Masoni
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Discussions Discussion Einztein Blog
Marco Masoni, Nov. 22, 2011

Exciting news! Wish us luck, as Einztein and Inquiry to Insight have jointly submitted an entry into the Digital Media and Learning (“DML”) badge competition.

As DML describes it:

The “Badges for Lifelong Learning” Competition will gather leading organizations, learning and assessment specialists, designers and technologists to create and test working badge systems in the wild. Together, competition participants will contribute to a robust badge ecosystem, where traditional and 21st century skills and achievements are inspired, recognized, translated across contexts, and displayed and managed across the web. The result for learners: new learning and knowledge, real-world outcomes like jobs, credit for new skills and achievements, and whole new ways to level up in their life and work.

Check it out (and scroll down to “like” us): http://www.dmlcompetition.net/Competition/4/badges-projects.php?id=2835

http://www.flickr.com/photos/61668055@N05/6384694751/
Marco Masoni
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Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, Jan. 19, 2011

The carbon footprint activity gives students the opportunity to take a critical view of their own energy consumption, and to find solutions to decrease their personal emissions.

http://i2i.stanford.edu/NewFootprint/footprint.html
Marco Masoni
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