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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Pachenc T-US, March 1, 2014

In my carbon footprint a big part of it came from the food portion. I think that more things in grocery stores should be more organic and have less packaging. More food that we are not using that will just end up in the trash should be sent to other countries instead of throwing them away. It will not only help us but help them too. The more organic foods you eat them more likely your carbon footprint will be lower. I did not realize the impact what I ate had on my carbon footprint and I just took that for granted. Living in the US also plays a part in the food portion of my carbon footprint since there is a lot of fast food. But if they’re where more healthy choices and organic foods where cheaper I feel as though everyone’s carbon footprint would be a lot lower.

Pachenc T-US
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Lizzy H USA, Feb. 28, 2014

I eat a lot of organic foods, I pay particular attention to eating organic meats, eggs, and milk products generally because I think it is safer and healthier. The fact that these choices reduce my overall carbon footprint is a great side effect for me! However, I read an interesting article about organic animal feed (particularly soy products) having to be imported to the United States from other countries, and a large portion of these came from places as far as China or India. If you are eating organic foods for the purpose of making more environmentally friendly decisions, this is a very concerning thought. I am unsure of how to handle this problem and am open to any suggestions!

Lizzy H USA
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Shawn Anderson, Feb. 28, 2014

I didn’t realize how much higher my carbon footprint on my food choices was than that of the rest of the United States and other countries. I noticed it was most likely due to the fact that for my sports choices i have to have a great calorie intake and a high protein intake and those variables probably increase my footprint significantly. I also eat a lot of other products some that i may need and others not so much. Instead of wasting money i could donate or find a way to help someone who may not be as lucky as i am to have 3 or more meals a day. Some people don’t even have one a day and they go through the daily struggle to survive without starving so that could be something i do to help since that is a growing problem in our nation.

Shawn Anderson
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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Lauren D-US, Feb. 27, 2014

Growing your own food has many social and environmental benefits. For one, it helps save money. You do not have to go to the grocery store and buy the vegetables and fruits. I would love to have a garden. I believe I would be able to do it. I have never grown anything in my life though. I would have to learn.

Lauren D-US
Comments (1)
  • Jesse Bowers Jesse Bowers Feb. 28, 2014
    I agree. Growing your own food will benefit you in the long run. It does help you save money and gas. It is very easy to do all it takes is time and patients. Also food taste way better when you have grown it yourself and put your own time and effort into harvesting this food.

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Lauren D-US, Feb. 27, 2014

When I calculated my footprint my food was higher than most. I have never thought about how much I take for granted the food that I have. I believe it has something to do with how accessible food is here. I could walk to the store right down the street and get anything I desire. But some people do not have that opportunity. I think we could do more to stop world hunger but I do not know how to go about doing that.

Lauren D-US
Comments (1)
  • Allison C-US Allison C-US Feb. 28, 2014
    There are a lot of ways to combat world hunger, but none of them are easy. The only thing I can really think of that would change a good bit is reducing your meat intake—40% of the world's grain goes to feeding livestock, which is a huge waste.

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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Maddi Ownbey, Feb. 27, 2014

When I calculated my Carbon footprint mine was a good bit lower than our nations average. Living in the United States makes my footprint as a whole a lot bigger than the countries in the rest of the world. To be honest, people who live here, including myself, are so wasteful and inconsiderate. I learned that I need to carpool more for sure. There is no way possible for me to walk or even ride my bike to school. I just live too far away. It’s about a 20 minute drive to school, church, the grocery store, I would be walking or riding my bike literally all day. My diet is actually a lot lower than the average just because I only eat 1 or 2 meals a day. I snack some but not too much. My family recycles and burns as much trash as we can, though we still use about 3 or 4 bags of trash a week. But there is also four people that live in my house. Is there anything I can do to decrease my footprint?

Maddi Ownbey
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Discussions Discussion Food & hunger
Caitlin Bond, Feb. 27, 2014

My name is Caitlin Bond and I live in South Carolina. After calculating my carbon footprint, I was surprised to see the difference choices in diet can affect the carbon footprint one carries. I did not know that it made any difference on your environmental mark and I was surprised to see that mine was actually pretty high, probably because of the amount of to-go orders I take with me since I don’t usually have time to sit down and have a meal. I’m looking to eat more meals at home and eat fruits and vegetables more often since they are organic in order to lower my carbon footprint.

Caitlin Bond
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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Natalia W-US, Feb. 26, 2014

My mother and I like to grow our own vegetables and herbs during the summer time. We try our best in the wintertime but we don’t have a place in a window to put them for the plants to grow. We like the fresh taste, and it’s so cool to see how well you did growing your own! As for our backyard, we would grow a lot more than we do now but we don’t have that land to grow it on.

Natalia W-US
Comments (2)
  • kevin prince boateng kevin prince boateng Feb. 27, 2014
    me too i have got a garden where i grow vegetebles and fruits like onion,garlic,courgettes,tomatoes,salad,potatos and some fruits. i like coltivate because is more healty and cheap. :)
  • Annie D-US Annie D-US Feb. 27, 2014
    This is such an awesome and healthy way to get your own food! It’s also super good for the environment. When I get older I want to keep a garden and grow everything fresh because I know it’ll save me money as well. Land is definitely the key to start growing but sometimes they have community gardens around areas.

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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Courtney R-US, Feb. 26, 2014

In living in a smaller town with more farm land than city roads, farming is popular. Many people living here have the land to grow vegetables, but don’t have the patience or time. Growing and buying vegetables locally would make a good use of land and grow your own vegetables for a lower cost than buying them at the store! Also, locally grown food always seems to have a better taste and is also fresh. Personally, I prefer eating locally grown fruits and vegetables than having the food shipped to my store from far away.

Courtney R-US
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Discussions Discussion Home grown
Andrea C-US, Feb. 23, 2014

When I got my carbon footprints back I was shocked to discover that the majority of my CO2 emissions came from food. Four meals out of my seven meals consist of meat; so to discover that meat is a large sum of the CO2 that I personally produce shocked me. I have also just found out that most meat will now give me acid reflux. In a strange way having acid reflux has made me cut down the consumption of meat I eat. I am not saying everyone should get acid reflux, but I am saying that is possible to eat less meat in order to cut down our CO2 emissions. In my hometown, we do not have a local garden, but our class is working to make one at the High School. I believe that our community would use the local garden, which would in turn help our environment. The only problem with the garden is the size, if it were to feed just half of our community the garden would have to be double the size that it is now.

Andrea C-US
Comments (1)
  • Emily R-US Emily R-US Feb. 25, 2014
    I completely agree with you Andrea that the town we live in, Clover SC, would greatly benefit from having more local food options. We have a few produce stands scattered here and there, but there is no established market for locally grown food. This poses a huge problem for people trying to reduce their carbon footprint by changing food habits. I feel that it is almost unrealistic to live completely off of a home garden and the few fresh food stands available. If a real difference is to be seen, and initiative will have to be made by towns as a whole. Farmers markets can help reduces wasted energy in transporting produce as well as eliminate foods made in factories with unnecessary additives! I think steps should be made to making the grocery store only an option and not the required.

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