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Discussions Discussion Food Preparation in the Home
Teresa Johnson, Sept. 28, 2012

I have been asked to teach a basic food prep course in an online format. It will be a 3000 level course and the only pre-rec is basic nutrition. This format looks like a great way to build the online lab. Are there other courses on the Web like this?

Teresa Johnson
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Discussions Discussion Cooking
K Young, Dec. 27, 2011

Carrot Fennel Soup - I love making this soup in the winter…

http://www.carstravelfood.com/2011/12/26/carrot-fennel-soup/
K Young
Comments (4)
  • Cylvia Cho Cylvia Cho Dec. 27, 2011
    Looks delish. I would have never thought of combining carrots and fennel in a soup. We grow fennel in our yard so I will definitely try it out.
  • K Young K Young Dec. 27, 2011
    Agreed! I only use Extra Virgin always anyways. BTW Trader Joe's has some really good CA olive oil - great for salads and topping on pasta. Lucky to have garden space! Do you compost too? I'm doing that at a friend's house for now, and it's guilt-free trash, altho an extra errand a week. But worth it.
  • Cylvia Cho Cylvia Cho Dec. 28, 2011
    Yes, I do compost. It's so easy, once you get the hang of it. By the way, here's a comparison of TJ olive oils that I found useful: http://aintfoundagoodtitleblog.wordpress.com/2011/07/02/trader-joes-extra-virgin-olive-oil-food-review-oil-off-deux/
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Discussions Discussion Cooking
K Young, Dec. 26, 2011

Easy Fried Rice…instead of paying $9 at the local Chinese take out place, it’s easy to make your own…

http://www.carstravelfood.com/2011/12/26/easy-fried-rice/
K Young
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Discussions Discussion Cooking
K Young, Dec. 24, 2011

I try to cook as much as I can and when there’s time, it’s all about trying new recipes, especially duplicating favorite dishes I’ve had at a restaurant. Tried Larb and was very pleased with the outcome of this easy Thai dish/recipe…

P.S. If anyone has a foolproof recipe for Pad Thai, would love it. Have all the authentic ingredients and have never quite duplicated it the way they make it at the local Thai place…and/or a good panang curry recipe…

http://www.carstravelfood.com/2011/12/23/easy-thai-recipe-for-larb/
K Young
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Discussions Discussion Off the table?
Michelle N -USA, Nov. 17, 2011

Something I cannot give up and is “off the table” is using my stove, oven, microwave, and other appliances having to do with food. I know I’m not the only one who enjoys food, especially making it. Cooking is a great hobby of mine and the idea of giving up the gasoline and electricity powered utensils seem practically impossible to me. I cook almost every day of my life and use my appliances the most on special occasions and holidays like Thanksgiving. Just because I say using it is “off the table” doesn’t mean I am not going to try to cut back and conserve as much energy as possible. According to ecolife.com, a guide to green living, you can save a lot of energy just by modifying your cooking habits. Things like getting pots and pans that fit perfectly on the stove so all the heat won’t go to waste, defrosting food in the microwave before putting it in the oven so the oven doesn’t waste energy on getting it to room temperature, and arranging the racks in the oven to have better heat circulation all make an impact on your carbon footprint and better help the environment. By doing this, I will have made my passion of cooking a little less detrimental to the earth.

http://www.ecolife.com/reno-energy/saving-energy-tips/save-energy-cooking.html
Michelle N -USA
Comments (1)
  • Erin G-USA Erin G-USA Nov. 23, 2011
    Wow, these are some really good tips! I think that a lot of times, people don't really think about cooking when they're trying to be more environmentally-friendly, but food really does have a huge impact on your carbon footprint. I think that when it comes to trying to be more “green”, it's good to start with the little things like changing the way you cook, so that they add up to really make a difference.

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Discussions Discussion Korean Food
Cylvia Cho, Nov. 9, 2011

I’m thinking about our Thanksgiving menu and you know what I love about this holiday…? It’s “American” in the best sense. Whatever country you came from to get to this country, and whatever culinary traditions you brought with you, rest assured, the Thanksgiving dinner table welcomes them. It’s fascinating how Italians, Greeks, Mexicans, Tahitians, etc. (you name ‘em!), have injected their favorite dishes into the traditional Thanksgiving meal. Yes, let’s not leave Koreans out, either. After all, what’s turkey and gravy without kimchi (see pic below :)???

Here’s a fun blog entry from Esther Sung that echoes my sentiments… http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/blogs/editor/2007/11/turkey-with-a-s.html

http://www.flickr.com/photos/ginandjuice/4193618938/
Cylvia Cho
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Discussions Discussion Food and Gender
Emily Nelsen, Nov. 8, 2011

Good background article about food and gender and their interactions. Its interesting that this stuff involves everyday life but we take it for granted. For me its interesting food for thought- pun intended!

Across many cultures and epochs, people have constituted, expressed, and bridged gender differences through foodways—the beliefs and behaviors surrounding the production, distribution, and consumption of food. Through the division of labor, alimentary exchanges, access to food, and the meanings surrounding eating, men and women have enacted their identity, roles, and power.
……. more of the article after the link:

http://www.answers.com/topic/gender-and-food
Emily Nelsen
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Discussions Discussion Food and Gender
Emily Nelsen, Feb. 2, 2011

For years, a new culinary trend called ‘molecular cooking’ has been touted as the most exciting development in haute cuisine. It is now the newest fashion for chefs to offer their customers fake caviar made from sodium alginate and calcium, burning sherbets, spaghetti made from vegetables, and instant ice cream, fast-frozen using liquid nitrogen. In the most recent ranking of the world’s top 50 chefs—by the British magazine Restaurant—the top three chefs were Ferran Adria from El Bulli in Rosas, Spain

http://www.nature.com/embor/journal/v7/n11/full/7400850.html
Emily Nelsen
Comments (1)
  • Marco Masoni Marco Masoni Feb. 24, 2011
    can you do this at home or do you have to be a chef?

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Discussions Discussion Food and Gender
Emily Nelsen, Feb. 2, 2011

I want to learn more about this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molecular_gastronomy
Emily Nelsen
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Discussions Discussion Food and Gender
Emily Nelsen, Jan. 15, 2011

Really cool conference that I still need to watch. Very cool topic, “course” entitled: “Women, Men, and Food: Putting Gender on the Table” from Harvard’s Radcliffe institute of advanced studies.

http://athome.harvard.edu/food/
Emily Nelsen
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