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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
madeline tuazon, Oct. 18, 2013

Hello All :)
Recently in my science class we did a little project with calculating our Carbon Footprints. Going into this I never gave much thought to ‘Carbon Footprints’ or that even the littlest of things I do in my every day life can contribute to a bigger picture. When I took the survey / input my information I was a little nervous to see what I was gonna end up having as my result. Since I live in the U.S., I was aware that we have one of the most polluted places and the highest amounts of CO2. Surprisingly though, my results came to be about a little below average. I was so relieved to find that out, but other than that I was glad to find out which activities are raising that level. Out of the four categories the two that were the main sources were transportation and household things. I was more shocked with the transportation being so high because I’ve only traveled a couple of times and we only really go to school, and I’ve been on at least 2 flights over the past year. As for household means I often tend to leave on the lights, or in my house we leave things plugged in when they aren’t in use, air conditioning is often used, and even the amount of water sad to say isn’t always conserved. On the upside though my family does a lot of recycling at home and we have compost. As for the food and purchases that wasn’t very high. I think I’ve learned that I need to be more aware of the little activities that I do on a day to day basis. Conserving more and more electricity, water, gases will be something I will to try to aim for in my everyday life tasks. Seeing my results motivates me to try for better.

madeline tuazon
Comments (4)
  • Matilda J_Na11bSwe Matilda J_Na11bSwe Oct. 21, 2013
    Flying increases the carbon footprint a lot. My footprint got high over average mainly because of that I have flown more than ususal this year. My footprint was also high in the household part and that's because I live with my family in a not necessary big house, therefore we need to use more energy to heat it in the winter. Things like living in a big house can affect more than we think, atleast I was surprised that it was such a big difference.
  • Andrew W Andrew W Oct. 23, 2013
    Hello,
    I recently did the Carbon Footprint Challenge as well and I wanted to give my response to it and about how this affects the environment:
    When I filled out the CFC online, two things became very clear: I was way above the average in travel and food, whilst lower on purchases and electric consumption at home.
    After looking at the number's I understood why: I live in a house full of fluorescent light bulbs and have good habits about turning off lights, I'm a teen and need a high caloric intake, I travel a lot more than the average person does especially on plane trips, and I don't really buy a lot of new items and clothes at all.
    After also looking through the questions and fiddling with the numbers on some things, I learned that fluorescent light bulbs instead of incandescent makes a huge difference, that planes bur a ton of carbon dioxide, that caloric intake is the biggest factor in carbon dioxide emissions, and recycling whatever you can.
  • Kyle K Kyle K Oct. 25, 2013
    After doing the carbon footprint challenge, I too have learned that I need to be more aware of the little things I do daily. Two of my biggest sources of releasing greenhouse gases were transportation and home. Who knew that turning the faucet off while brushing your teeth would save so much more water? Before the challenge, I never though about what I was doing in my house: leaving lights on after I leave a room, taking a 10 minute shower, and even throwing away things that could be recycled. I also never released how much CO2 a plane ride can release and seeing how I've taken 5 in the past year, I feel a little bad for polluting the air.
    After doing this challenge, I'm going to make sure I release the least amount of greenhouse gases I can. I'll take the time to turn off lights, unplugging things when they aren't in use, and turning of the water whenever I'm not using it. I'll also recycle everything I can and I may even start to compost. This challenge has really opened up my eyes to what humans are doing to the world.
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Discussions Discussion home grown foods
Sofia M- United States, Oct. 7, 2013

Growing your own food at home can help reduce your carbon footprint and is also healthier. One of the reasons that growing your food (i.e. vegetable garden) at home can reduce carbon emissions is if you grow your food in a community garden, or even in your own back yard, you can avoid the long distances that the food will travel to get to your grocery stores. This not only allows for less carbon emissions, but it also gives you fresher foods! Also, according to http://www.veryediblegardens.com/iveg/why-grow-food growing, “processing, packaging, storing and transporting of what we eat make up 37% of the average eco-footprint. Freshly eaten home-grown food produces no green house emissions. ” I was so surprised to hear that statistic! Think how much you could reduce your carbon footprint by growing your own vegetables! There are many options to make gardening easy for you. If you have a spacious backyard or front yard, you could consider planting your garden there. Also, you could have a box garden in your front porch. If neither of these work for you, you can talk to your neighborhood, or a community center or church about creating a community garden.

http://www.carbonrally.com/challenges/33-organic-gardening
Sofia M- United States
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Discussions Discussion home grown foods
Sofia M- United States, Oct. 7, 2013

Growing your own food at home can help reduce your carbon footprint and is also healthier. One of the reasons that growing your food (i.e. vegetable garden) at home can reduce carbon emissions is if you grow your food in a community garden, or even in your own back yard, you can avoid the long distances that the food will travel to get to your grocery stores. This not only allows for less carbon emissions, but it also gives you fresher foods! Also, according to http://www.veryediblegardens.com/iveg/why-grow-food growing, “processing, packaging, storing and transporting of what we eat make up 37% of the average eco-footprint. Freshly eaten home-grown food produces no green house emissions. ” I was so surprised to hear that statistic! Think how much you could reduce your carbon footprint by growing your own vegetables! There are many options to make gardening easy for you. If you have a spacious backyard or front yard, you could consider planting your garden there. Also, you could have a box garden in your front porch. If neither of these work for you, you can talk to your neighborhood, or a community center or church about creating a community garden.

http://www.carbonrally.com/challenges/33-organic-gardening
Sofia M- United States
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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
Mia Sudec, April 30, 2013

Hi! My name is Mia Sudec. I live in Varaždin,Croatia. I’m 17 years old. My class decided to participate in this survey. My carbon footprint is 4726 kg.

My results:
Transportation: 0kg
Home: 2634kg
Food 1794kg
Purchases: 298kg

My country:
Transportation: 874kg
Home: 1956kg
Food 2308kg
Purchases: 597kg

Mia Sudec
Comments (2)
  • Yousra Kandeel Yousra Kandeel May 1, 2013
    This is so cool Mia, your Carbon footprint is so low compared to others in your region. Please share how you can maintain such a low rate. Your carbon footprint is around 1000 kg under the average person in Croatia, thats impressive!
  • Mia Sudec Mia Sudec May 2, 2013
    Hello Yousra! My carbon footprint is low because i dont use any of the public transport vehicles.I only use my bike for my everyday needs:)

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Discussions Discussion Wants or needs?
Charles Lee, Nov. 13, 2012

Hi my name is Charles, and I study in Dominican International School. I think this topic is not just for teenagers, it can be apply to all ages. Nowadays, people usually change their electric devices frequently, because companies keep making new products, then people will want to buy the new one, whether they want to be cool or just because they want it, but think about it, do we really need so many different kind but same function stuff? I think the answer will be no. Now teenagers will want to buy so many things, I think mostly the reasons is because someone else have it, so want they want to have it too, but they are not necessary need it. So I think when we are buying any stuff not just electric devices, we need to think about it first, do we really need it, or we just want it.

Charles Lee
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Discussions Discussion Wants or needs?
Tommy Dao, Nov. 10, 2012

Hi everyone, my name is Tommy Dao, I am a grade 9 student studying at Dominican International School in Taipei, Taiwan. I think the forum question is very interesting. Is having the latest technology a want or a need?
I think having the latest technology is probably a want. The modern technology is developing fast and everyday, a new product is invented. Those electronic product companies change their designs every time so that their products won’t look boring, and say that their newest products are latest technology (For example: Apple’s Iphone 5). People will buy those products just to show that they are modern people, they are not out of date, to show off,… But have those customers ever thought about their old products that can still be use? Why would they want to buy a new phone when their old phone still can be use? It was just a waste of money to buy those kinds of products.
But sometimes, having latest technology can be a need. For example: latest medical technology that can cure cancer (just an example, there is no such machine like that yet), people who have cancer will buy it because they want to cure cancer, that’s a need. Not just the example above, other medical technology machines are important, too.
Technology can be a need or a want depends on different circumstances. If you know what you want or need, you won’t regret for what you bought.

Tommy Dao
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Discussions Discussion Is Climate Change Mitigation 100% Beneficial?
Jason Hodin, Oct. 2, 2012

I was asked by Nathan to make this an “official” ISCFC discussion.

While the topic is appropriate, the content is not.

This entire entry below by Nathan was plagiarized from the Wall Street Journal.

No Need to Panic about Global Warming” from January 2012

We at the ISCFC are seeking opinion and discussion, not copy & paste without attribution.

Jason
ISCFC Media & Content

Jason Hodin
Comments (5)
  • Jason Hodin Jason Hodin Oct. 2, 2012
    OK Nathan, I appreciate you writing back.

    It is absolutely crucial to give attribution, not least so that we can evaluate where the information came from and see what a response might be from climate scientists.

    In fact, there was such a response:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204740904577193270727472662.html
  • Nathan L-US Nathan L-US Oct. 2, 2012
    I do give credit as in I posted the source to the several different sites as to which the evidence derives from. I did not plagiarize from one article, rather I made a claim and warranted it with the sites which i specified within my discussion. I.E “In accordance to Dailymail.co.uk. If i had missed siting a specific piece of evidence I appologize.
  • Nathan L-US Nathan L-US Oct. 2, 2012
    Sorry did not see pervious post. I apologize once again. If u would like me to link the websites as to were I got all of my information i will do so.
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Discussions Discussion Is Climate Change Mitigation 100% Beneficial?
Nathan L-US, Oct. 1, 2012

I feel as though there are several misconceptions as to what Climate Change does and how it directly effects us. What are your positions when it comes to the mitigation of Climate Change, and how would follow through with to have a significant international impact?

Nathan L-US
Comments (10)
  • Jose Pelcastre Jose Pelcastre Oct. 2, 2012
    You know, I think you have a point. Recently I’ve been doing research on global warming and found that it's not actually CO2 that's causing global warming, but methane released by, believe it or not, cow farts. As Noam Mohr, a physicist with degrees from Yale and Penn, says, the most prominent reason for global warming is really methane. An excerpt from one of articles says “By far the most important non-CO2 greenhouse gas is methane, and the number one source of methane worldwide is animal agriculture. Methane is responsible for nearly as much global warming as all other non-CO2 greenhouse gases put together. Methane is 21 times more powerful a greenhouse gas than CO2. While atmospheric concentrations of CO2 have risen by about 31% since pre-industrial times, methane concentrations have more than doubled. Whereas human sources of CO2 amount to just 3% of natural emissions, human sources produce one and a half times as much methane as all natural sources. In fact, the effect of our methane emissions may be compounded as methane-induced warming in turn stimulates microbial decay of organic matter in wetlands—the primary natural source of methane. “
    But I think it’s not just that the costs are too high, as your point shows, rather that it’s possibly too late to do anything at all. Prof. Veerabhadran Ramanathan, a Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric and Climate Science at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the University of California at San Diego, and Dr Nithya Ramanathan, a Fellow at the Centre of Embedded Networked Sensing at the University of California at Los Angeles and Presiden Nexleaf Analytics, along with the Carnegie Institution for Science Department of Global Ecology say that because CO2 actually stays in the air for very prolonged periods of time. I quote, “carbon dioxide emissions remain in the atmosphere for many centuries, because the ocean and vegetation on land absorb carbon dioxide only slowly over time. As a result, there is a warming effect long after the initial clearing of land… the relatively large amount of carbon dioxide that we are emitting today will continue to have relatively large impacts on the atmosphere and climate for many centuries into the future. “
  • Jose Pelcastre Jose Pelcastre Oct. 2, 2012
    Also, Indean Salehyan, the Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of North Texas says that it’s really just bad allocation of resources and that it is often used as an end to some unjustifiable mean. Focusing on climate change in general as a violent threat acts as a diversion to catastrophe-relief and technology, according to a 2007 article. “These claims generally boil down to an argument about resource scarcity. Desertification, sea-level rise, more-frequent severe weather events, an increased geographical range of tropical disease, and shortages of freshwater will lead to violence over scarce necessities. Friction between haves and have-nots will increase, and governments will be hard-pressed to provide even the most basic services. In some scenarios, mass migration will ensue, whether due to desertification, natural disasters, and rising sea levels, or as a consequence of resource wars. Environmental refugees will in turn spark political violence in receiving areas, and countries in the global North will erect ever higher barriers to keep culturally unwelcome and hungry foreigners out. The number of failed states, meanwhile, will increase as governments collapse in the face of resource wars and weakened state capabilities, and transnational terrorists and criminal networks will move in. International wars over depleted water and energy supplies will also intensify. The basic need for survival will supplant nationalism, religion, or ideology as the fundamental root of conflict.¶ Dire scenarios like these may sound convincing, but they are misleading. Even worse, they are irresponsible, for they shift liability for wars and human rights abuses away from oppressive, corrupt governments. Additionally, focusing on climate change as a security threat that requires a military response diverts attention away from prudent adaptation mechanisms and new technologies that can prevent the worst catastrophes.”
    I have a a ton of evidence also that talks about how warming is actually good for biodiversity, but I want to hear what others have to say as well.
  • Jose Pelcastre Jose Pelcastre Oct. 2, 2012
    Owais Safaraz, I feel like the majority of the fight against mitigating climae change isn't done at home, because unless everyone switches to electrical cars, there isn't really a viable way for people to contribute to the fight against global warming. But that's okay, as Nathan Leal pointed to earlier, the government cannot possible, within our current limitations, “fix” climate change.
    However, my research, as mentioned earlier, could provide a solution that people at home could live by. As Mohr wrote, “The conclusion is simple: arguably the best way to reduce global warming in our lifetimes is to reduce or eliminate our consumption of animal products. Simply by going vegetarian (or, strictly speaking, vegan), we can eliminate one of the major sources of emissions of methane, the greenhouse gas responsible for almost half of the global warming impacting the planet today.” Of course, that means we have to do something with the cows, so it's almost called upon that we eliminate the cows in order to stop methane emissions at the source. That's not going to happen any time soon.
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Discussions Discussion Student footprints
karim barakat, May 5, 2012

Hi everyone my name is Karim barakat, i’am from Egypt, Cairo. I did my footprint survey couple of days ago and i discoverd that my carbon footprint was about four times more then my country’s average carbon footprint. I think that the reason for my high Carbon footprint is becouse i live far from my school so i have to use alot of transportation and also because of the use of alot of air conditioning in the hot summer. I learned in what categories did my carbon consumption exceeded and in which categories should i work on to decrease my carbon footprint. In conclution to my discussion i have came up with a way to decrease my carbon foot print which is to use less air conditioning in the summer and to try a share a car with a friend instead of using a car alone and increasing my carbon footprint.

karim barakat
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Discussions Discussion Welcome to Einztein
Vendela R, April 22, 2012

Hi!
when playing around with the calculator, i realized how high my carbon footprint is due to all the flights i make across the globe to visit my family in southern africa. i also realized how drastically the footprint decreased when changing meat quantites.
i would thus like to promote locally produced goods that can be transported within a country with environmental friendly veichles.

By promoting days like Meat Free mondays, which really isnt very hard because you do survive one meet free day per week, its not very much at all, and buying locally produced meat, we can make a huge difference on our co2 emissions!

ofcourse the problem remains that not everything can be produced everywhere at all times, but better start where we can instead of doing nothing! daily life changes is the most important factor in improving our results and reducing our co2 emissions. recycling papers and waste materials, turning off the tap when not using water while brushing our teeth, filling the dishwasher BEFORE turning it on will make a difference. dont wait for them big politicans and environment people to come up with a big fancy solution that will cause a paradyme shift in our society and ways of living, when doing things that should be obvious to us can make a huge difference immediately!

Be smart -Save the planet ^^

Vendela R
Comments (5)
  • bryan metz bryan metz April 24, 2012
    i agree 112% with everything you said.
  • brandon bailey brandon bailey April 24, 2012
    i agree. everyone should be able to not eat meat aleast one day of the week .
  • abdelhamid derawi abdelhamid derawi May 5, 2012
    I strongly agree we should decrease the percentage of meat eaten daily. But then we should also decrease the amount of trees cut down every day.
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