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Discussions Discussion Technology solutions for climate change
Sara LUSA, Oct. 10, 2013

While most of the world fixates on how to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases we emit into the atmosphere, scientists and engineers around the world are busy working on various “geo-engineering” technologies—many of which are highly theoretical—to mitigate global warming and its effects. One of the theories proposed for reducing global warming involves deflecting heat away from the Earth’s surface with solar shields or satellites with movable reflectors. Computer models suggest that blocking eight percent of the sun’s Earth-bound radiation would effectively counteract the warming effect of our CO2 pollution.Another technological fix involves “sequestration,” the storage of CO2 either deep underground or deep in the ocean. Some of the nation’s largest utilities, which are also “washing” coal to filter out impurities, are working on ways to capture the CO2 they emit and store it miles below the Earth’s surface.

These are only a few of many solutions that should be researched further and experimented upon.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=geoengineering-solutions
Sara LUSA
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Discussions Discussion Benefits of a Carbon Sink
Dave G-USA, Oct. 7, 2013

The amount of oxygen in the water in our ocean is strongly affected by organisms through photosynthesis. Much of the oxygen produced by photosynthesis in the ocean is released to the atmosphere. With this, carbon dioxide makes up more than 80% of the dissolved gas in the ocean, meaning that the ocean stores more than 50 times as much carbon dioxide as the atmosphere! This effect is the reason for the ocean becoming a carbon sink. The activities that we do daily such as using our appliances or driving a car can add up in our carbon footprint and increase the carbon that’s being put into the ocean. It’s been scientifically proven that the carbon has negative effects to marine organisms. For example, the shells of crabs and other organisms with shells, are starting to have weaker shells than normal. However, have you ever thought that the carbon in the ocean can actually be a good thing? We know that there are plants in the ocean such as plankton and seaweed. For photosynthesis to occur, they need tons of carbon dioxide. If the excess amount of carbon dioxide is used by marine plants, some fishes who eat them or use them might actually benefit from the extra carbon. Also, with more carbon dioxide, plants can convert more to be oxygen.

Dave G-USA
Comments (1)
  • Dave G-USA Dave G-USA Oct. 7, 2013
    The amount of oxygen in the water in our ocean is strongly affected by organisms through photosynthesis. Much of the oxygen produced by photosynthesis in the ocean is released to the atmosphere. With this, carbon dioxide makes up more than 80% of the dissolved gas in the ocean, meaning that the ocean stores more than 50 times as much carbon dioxide as the atmosphere! This effect is the reason for the ocean becoming a carbon sink. The activities that we do daily such as using our appliances or driving a car can add up in our carbon footprint and increase the carbon that's being put into the ocean. It's been scientifically proven that the carbon has negative effects to marine organisms. For example, the shells of crabs and other organisms with shells, are starting to have weaker shells than normal. However, have you ever thought that the carbon in the ocean can actually be a good thing? We know that there are plants in the ocean such as plankton and seaweed. For photosynthesis to occur, they need tons of carbon dioxide. If the excess amount of carbon dioxide is used by marine plants, some fishes who eat them or use them might actually benefit from the extra carbon. Also, with more carbon dioxide, plants can convert more to be oxygen.

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Discussions Discussion Climate Progress
Lea C-USA, Nov. 12, 2012

What do you think is the most effient way to reduce carbon dioxide emissions?

Lea C-USA
Comments (2)
  • Maggie S-USA Maggie S-USA Nov. 15, 2012
    Finding ways to use Carbon-free energy sources, like solar-power and wind-power, as well as energy conservation would help. cap-and-trade systems also have goals to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, which is also helpful
  • Emily Z-USA Emily Z-USA Oct. 2, 2013
    While large scale approaches like investing in renewable carbon-free sources of energy like wind and solar power and implementing cap-and-trade systems comprise an essential aspect of reducing our society's carbon emissions, I think that it is also important to work on reducing carbon emissions from the ground up by simply educating people about the importance reducing their own carbon footprints by utilizing low-emission forms of transportation, buying produce locally, and reducing the amount of energy that they expend for heating and air conditioning—seven billion people all working to reduce their carbon emission would engender tremendous impacts—without even taking enormous amounts of individual effort.

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Discussions Discussion To reduce carbon footprint in Taiwan
Agnes Yeh, Nov. 6, 2012

Hi everybody! My name is Agnes, I am 13 years old and in grade 8.I live in Taipei,Taiwan and I’m studying at Dominican International School. I’d like to talk about the carbon footprint in Taiwan,recently I’ve learned that Taiwan’s footprint is much higher than the average of the world. I think most of the footprint is caused by what we do when we are home.
Summer in Taiwan can be very hot and many families use the air conditioner to cool down. When people are inside a building they would open the air conditioner so often. Like our house we will turn on each room’s air conditioner when we are in different room. I want to do the best I could to help Taiwan to reduce carbon footprint so I will use the fans instead of air conditioner.
However, winter in Taiwan can be pretty cold as well and people use heaters to keep warm. I think we could use thick blankets or sleep together with our parents to use only one heater.

Agnes Yeh
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Discussions Discussion Is Climate Change Mitigation 100% Beneficial?
Jason Hodin, Oct. 2, 2012

I was asked by Nathan to make this an “official” ISCFC discussion.

While the topic is appropriate, the content is not.

This entire entry below by Nathan was plagiarized from the Wall Street Journal.

No Need to Panic about Global Warming” from January 2012

We at the ISCFC are seeking opinion and discussion, not copy & paste without attribution.

Jason
ISCFC Media & Content

Jason Hodin
Comments (5)
  • Jason Hodin Jason Hodin Oct. 2, 2012
    OK Nathan, I appreciate you writing back.

    It is absolutely crucial to give attribution, not least so that we can evaluate where the information came from and see what a response might be from climate scientists.

    In fact, there was such a response:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204740904577193270727472662.html
  • Nathan L-US Nathan L-US Oct. 2, 2012
    I do give credit as in I posted the source to the several different sites as to which the evidence derives from. I did not plagiarize from one article, rather I made a claim and warranted it with the sites which i specified within my discussion. I.E “In accordance to Dailymail.co.uk. If i had missed siting a specific piece of evidence I appologize.
  • Nathan L-US Nathan L-US Oct. 2, 2012
    Sorry did not see pervious post. I apologize once again. If u would like me to link the websites as to were I got all of my information i will do so.
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Discussions Discussion Environment - CS Monitor
Bert Breton, April 6, 2012

Ice age study delivers blow to global-warming skeptics:

It’s the latest indication that researchers’ understanding of CO2’s effects on climate “is confirmed by the history of climate,” notes Richard Alley, a Penn State University geologist who specializes in studying glaciers and the climate records encoded in the ice.

http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2012/0405/Ice-age-study-delivers-blow-to-global-warming-skeptics
Bert Breton
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Discussions Discussion Life on the Reef: Amazing World of Coral Fish…
Mark Collins, Jan. 16, 2012

Rising carbon dioxide confuses brain signaling in fish

“This could be a big deal,” says neurobiologist Andrew Dittman of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center in Seattle. Dittman, who was not affiliated with the study, says the new findings could go a long way toward explaining curious sensory changes observed in fish exposed to acidifying waters. The scary scent of predators, for example, can suddenly become alluring.

http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/337677/title/Rising_carbon_dioxide_confuses_brain_signaling_in_fish
Mark Collins
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Discussions Discussion Deforestation SOS
Jenny Rothberg, Oct. 17, 2011

Trees Cool the Climate…Isn’t That Cool?

Researchers from Carnegie’s Global Ecology department found that evaporation of water from trees not only cools things locally, but also globally, as well. The cycle produces clouds that reflect sunlight, meaning less energy (heat) makes landfall. The net result? Cooling.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/neil-wagner/trees-cool-the-climate-is_b_971032.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HHDMKm4FXsw
Jenny Rothberg
Comments (3)
  • Marco Masoni Marco Masoni Oct. 17, 2011
    I recently read an article about designing buildings to absorb CO2. Maybe the idea came from trees.
  • Steve Durgan Steve Durgan Oct. 17, 2011
    A great analogy from the comments section of the article: “trees are gigantic water pumps”…literally pumping water from the ground into the atmosphere.
  • Courtney K-USA Courtney K-USA Feb. 12, 2012
    That is really interesting…I actually never knew that! :)

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Discussions Discussion Deforestation SOS
Bert Breton, March 14, 2011

Group seeks forest restoration to cleanse planet: COPEMISH, Mich. – Redwoods and sequoias towering majestically over California’s northern coast. Oaks up to 1,000 years old nestled in a secluded corner of Ireland. The legendary cedars of Lebanon.
“In our infinite wisdom, we’ve destroyed 98 percent of the old growth forests that kept nature in balance for thousands of years,” said David Milarch, the group’s co-founder. “That’s what we intend to put back.”

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20110313/ap_on_re_us/us_cleansing_trees
Bert Breton
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