Loading...

To post, comment, or enjoy any of the other features of Einztein, please register.
Already registered? Then log in!

Filter By
  • My Posts
  • Learned Posts
  • My Discussions
  • Joined Discussions
  • Favorite Members
  • Curated Posts
Join Now
Discussions Discussion Nukes post-Fukushima
William C, Feb. 10, 2014

Hello, I’m William Crouch from Palo Alto High School in the San Francisco Bay Area. Some harrowing reports have just been released from the company that the radiation reports were less than one fifth of the actual amount recorded for 2013. It seems scary that this is a threat to Japan and possibly the Pacific Ocean, and even more creepy that Tepco, the company in charge of this nuclear plant seems to be producing incorrect information in possible attempt to maintain a level of complacency for the people of the world. It may be a while longer before the effects are fully known, but it is not so easy to simply evacuate people from their country when it is on an island. The costs of the occasional nuclear disaster seem to outweigh the benefits, and one wonders why the plants are all more than thirty years old. If this world is to allow companies to continue using nuclear power, plants must be built to a much higher standard so that they put the lives of civilians at a much lower risk.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/rest-of-world/Fukushima-radiation-data-is-wildly-wrong-management-apologizes/articleshow/30163944.cms
William C
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Technology solutions for climate change
Sara LUSA, Oct. 10, 2013

While most of the world fixates on how to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases we emit into the atmosphere, scientists and engineers around the world are busy working on various “geo-engineering” technologies—many of which are highly theoretical—to mitigate global warming and its effects. One of the theories proposed for reducing global warming involves deflecting heat away from the Earth’s surface with solar shields or satellites with movable reflectors. Computer models suggest that blocking eight percent of the sun’s Earth-bound radiation would effectively counteract the warming effect of our CO2 pollution.Another technological fix involves “sequestration,” the storage of CO2 either deep underground or deep in the ocean. Some of the nation’s largest utilities, which are also “washing” coal to filter out impurities, are working on ways to capture the CO2 they emit and store it miles below the Earth’s surface.

These are only a few of many solutions that should be researched further and experimented upon.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=geoengineering-solutions
Sara LUSA
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Wants or needs?
Camille G-USA, Nov. 14, 2012

Everyone always says how they “need” the newest and best technology, most of the time meaning cell phones. A lot of people don’t realize what effect that these cell phones have on the environment, especially the amount of radiation that is given off by phones, which you will see in this short video. I don’t think that anyone NEEDS this by their head.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pqIZDIxJgXw&NR=1&feature=endscreen
Camille G-USA
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Nukes post-Fukushima
Andrew P, Feb. 8, 2012

If you want to know the latest deal about what’s going on there, you should watch this.

http://youtu.be/2aPpWCeMIVQ
Andrew P
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Nukes post-Fukushima
Joseph Curtis, Feb. 7, 2012

Japan’s Nuclear Exclusion Zone Shows Few Signs of Life:

What’s most striking about Japan’s nuclear exclusion zone, is there are no people, few cars, no sign of life, aside from the occasional livestock wandering empty roads. While workers of the Fukushima plant are bused in daily, the government has maintained a 12-mile no-go zone around the area for everyone else.

http://abcnews.go.com/International/fukushimas-nuclear-exclusion-zone-shows-signs-life/story?id=15521091#.TzG8NV3gLoh

The government has said it will take at least 30 years to decommission the crippled reactors. This nuclear wasteland may not be livable for decades.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Yof8WY5Rebc
Joseph Curtis
Comments (1)
  • Sophie FSeattleUSA Sophie FSeattleUSA April 25, 2012
    Is there any way that other countries could help out Japan and speed up this process? I know that they've received a lot of help from countries all over the world already, but is there anything more we could do? What happened in Japan could happen to any of us with nuclear plants near fissures. If we can figure out how to decommission the reactors faster, it may help prepare the rest of the the world, including Japan, for the future.

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Ask to Join
Discussions Discussion Resources to help teach about “Light”
Gerald Carey, Jan. 11, 2012

Seven activities using a Radiometer.
Needs a radiometer of course.

http://blog.teachersource.com/2012/01/11/what-makes-it-spin/
Gerald Carey
Comments

To comment on a restricted discussion, you must be a member of that discussion.

Ask to Join
Discussions Discussion Resources to help teach about “Light”
Gerald Carey, Jan. 11, 2012

Wow. A series of animations to help teach about light. I have used PhET before (e.g. with atoms) and they are very good. These animations are aimed more at high school students but might be useful revision.

http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulations/category/physics/light-and-radiation
Gerald Carey
Comments

To comment on a restricted discussion, you must be a member of that discussion.

Join Now
Discussions Discussion Nukes post-Fukushima
Henry Hamilton, Nov. 12, 2011

Mysterious radiation levels detected across Europe, says UN nuclear agency. IAEA say Fukushima blast not to blame and downplay seriousness of new levels.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2060469/Mysterious-radiation-le

Unusual levels of radioactive iodine-131 have been detected throughout Europe - primarily in Czech Republic and Germany - but the particles are not believed to pose a public health risk, the U.N.nuclear agency said on Friday. NASA have released images of 2,400 stars, known as the Tarantula Nebula, that are producing intense radiation and powerful winds, believed to be the cause for the detection in the atmosphere. Here’s a related video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vPJLDMIp2JE&feature=related
Henry Hamilton
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, April 21, 2011

Fukushima Daiichi Plant Workers Could Work Themselves to Death
China National NewsThursday
21st April, 2011  
(Source: The Epoch Times)
Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) workers, who have been working tirelessly to stabilize the fragile Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant, are at risk of depression and even death from overwork, says a doctor who recently examined them.

http://story.chinanationalnews.com/index.php/ct/9/cid/9366300fc9319e9b/id/44787605/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 23, 2011

TOKYO — Tokyo Water Bureau officials say levels of radioactive iodine in some city tap water is two times the recommended limit for infants.The officials told reporters Wednesday that a water treatment center in downtown Tokyo that supplies much of the city’s tap water found that some water contained 210 becquerels per liter of iodine 131.They said the limit for consumption of iodine 131 for infants is 100 becquerels per liter. They recommended that babies not be given tap water, although they said the water is not an immediate health risk for adults.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/03/23/tokyo-officials-warn-radiation-tap-water_n_839369.html
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Are you sure?