Loading...

To post, comment, or enjoy any of the other features of Einztein, please register.
Already registered? Then log in!

Filter By
  • My Posts
  • Learned Posts
  • My Discussions
  • Joined Discussions
  • Favorite Members
  • Curated Posts
Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 5, 2012

While attending SXSWedu, Einztein is also participating in Open Education Week, providing OCW/OER providers with a tour of its social learning network.

http://www.openeducationweek.org/einztein-open-education-week/
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, April 5, 2011

Academia As Commons
May 29, 2010

by Shahar Ozeri  

I received this in one of the edu-factory email updates. Now, I don’t really know if say, philosophical blogging, is going to amount to a sea-change within the discipline that many insist upon, but this article about open access technology and higher ed is interesting.

Academia as a Commons: 
How open technologies can help higher education expand collaboration, innovation and public access to knowledge.

By David Bollier
(David Bollier has been the Croxton Lecturer at Amherst College for the past semester, teaching a course, “The Rise of the Commons.” Below are remarks that he delivered at the Robert Frost Library on April 26, 2010).

I realize that any mention of digital technologies and copyright law can induce a certain mental stupor among many people. The topic is rife with many complicated legal and technical issues. But I believe that we commoners have too much at stake to leave copyright law to the lawyers and the Internet to the techies.

The very mission and identity of academia is implicated in the future of digital technologies, the Internet and copyright law. At stake is the ability of colleges and universities to act as inter-generational stewards of knowledge? to assure that their own scholarly output is freely accessible and usable?. to curate knowledge in better ways and to disseminate it as broadly as possible and to foster innovative research and learning.”

http://pervegalit.wordpress.com/2010/05/29/academia-as-commons/
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 27, 2011

Came across this article that echoes my sentiments: “Learning is Everywhere.”

Time’s Up – Learning Will Forever Be Part Formal, Part Informal and Part Social
By Dan Pontefract


With society wrapped in a cultural transformation expedited by technology, we continue to use an evaluation model that, quite simply, was built on the premise that learning occurs solely in a classroom.

Donald Kirkpatrick himself, interviewed in a November 2009 Chief Learning Officer article, said, “Top management, we call it the jury, is not going to approve budget unless you can prove that when people go back to the job they’re using what they learn, and that’s going to accomplish the results they look for.”

Notice the phrase “when people go back to the job”. Learning is a continuous, connected and collaborative process. It happens on the job, in the job, outside of the job and when not on the job so why on earth do we continue to evaluate our learners as if the only way competence exchange occurs is within the four physical walls of a classroom?

http://www.danpontefract.com/?p=711
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 24, 2011

Site that features tutorials on math, stats, programming, physics.

BetterExplained-dot-com

ABOUT:
“There’s always a better way to explain a topic. Insights are fluid, mutable, and work for different people. I’m sharing the insights that helped me, hoping they’ll help you too. Here’s my take on learning:
Ideas start hard and finish simple.

Complicated ideas get easier. Multiplication, reading and even tying your shoes seemed tough at first and are trivial now. Likewise, I believe (I know!) that math, science, business, technology or any topic can be understood at an intuitive level – after overcoming the initial complexity.
The best teacher is you – after you’ve learned the subject.

You are your own perfect tutor. Think about it – you overcame the problems and can explain the solution in language that makes sense. Unfortunately, we can’t go back in time. But I can share the “Ah-ha!” moments that I’ve found.

And maybe you think like me, so the explanation works for you too. Or maybe you think a little differently, and a helpful comment gives an insight that works better. Our “ah-ha!” moments are different, and that’s ok. There’s no single way to explain an idea, yet we all have a single textbook.”

http://betterexplained.com/about/
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 23, 2011

Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects. He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script — give students video lectures to watch at home, and do “homework” in the classroom with the teacher available to help.

http://www.ted.com/talks/salman_khan_let_s_use_video_to_reinvent_education.html
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 23, 2011

I recently came across Dara’s site, where she highlights some of the best OER she’s found. Great curating job.

From Dara:

For the last few years my hobby has been roaming the web, and listening to university course and lecture podcasts.I started this blog to share what I have learned about the best free courses and lectures.

Maybe you just heard the news: some of the world’s top universities are giving away thousands of hours of lectures in audio and video on the Internet. Anyone with a web connection can attend free virtual classes from the likes of Yale, Stanford and the University of California at Berkeley.

So how do you navigate this world of academic podcasts, webcasts and streaming audio and video?

http://diyscholar.wordpress.com/about/
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 22, 2011

15 Great Opencourseware Options to Improve Your Knowledge for Free

by MMarquit · 0 comments

One of the great things about technology is the ability you have to access a great deal of useful information. Additionally, you can learn just about anything with the help of the Internet. This includes access to a world class education. Many colleges and universities offer full courses online, allowing you to study at Harvard or MIT.

Naturally, you can’t expect to get credit when you access free open courseware. And you certainly won’t end up with a degree. But if you are looking for is a little extra knowledge and some enrichment, there are plenty of free options out there. Some collections even include complete syllabi, assignments, tests and labs. Here are 15 great opencourseware options that can help you improve your knowledge:

1. Einztein: This is a social learning network that allows you to find courses from around the world. A great curator of information related to all things free online learning.

http://couponshoebox.com/tips/
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 15, 2011

Einztein.com Helps You Get Educated for FREE! [Freeismylife.com]

Education is the key to a better life, but even simple online non-accredited classes can cost a fortune. And most of us are just looking for the knowledge and not a degree.  But did you know there is an easy way to find FREE online courses offered by universities?
Einztein.com is a searchable catalog of curated courses offered by providers as diverse as Stanford University and The British Museum. To find a course, enter a subject of interest in the search box and click “search” – or browse the selection of subjects. You can also filter your search results by course provider, subject and media type.You can browse the course descriptions, check out which courses received a good rating, and link out for a closer look.
If you find a course that you like, click on it and you will be taken to the course on the university’s website. I tried out the website by searching for an Intro to Java Course. I ended up on the website for SC San Diego which has a FREE online 10 week Into to Java Podcast that teaches Java to those with no prior Java experience.  The course has a perfect 5 out of 5 rating on Einztein. Pretty cool…

http://www.freeismylife.com/2011/03/find-free-online-university-courses.html
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 4, 2011

Open Learning InitiativeThe Harvard Extension School’s Open Learning Initiative brings a selection of noncredit online courses featuring Harvard faculty to the public for free.

http://www.extension.harvard.edu/openlearning/
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Discussions Discussion unselected
Marco Masoni, March 4, 2011

iBerry is run by an independent, not-for-profit group of volunteers. We provide information and resources for learners, educators, researchers and anyone else with an interest in adult education.Our focus is on connection rather than content - we see iBerry as one small part of an emerging and Open Global Education Network that one day will bring inexpensive education to any adult, anywhere in the world, regardless of their circumstances.* Porthole ? … No, not a spelling error - it’s a small but cheerful window in the side of the Higher Education ship - for purposes of illumination and enlightenment

http://iberry.com/
Marco Masoni
Comments

Please register or log in to post a comment.

Are you sure?